Ella Baker

Millions of Americans and supporters around the world joined in Women's Marches held on Saturday. We felt so much love, so
As a nation, we have failed to confront systemic racism. This won't change without white people really engaging. Developing this ability requires regular workouts as well as a heavy dose of humility.
Being honored as one of 21 Leaders for the 21st Century by Women's eNews is a tremendous honor for me. Even more amazing
Jacobs -- who died in Toronto on April 25, 2006 -- was a true "public intellectual" who put her ideas into practice. She loved cities and urban neighborhoods. She was fearless and feisty. She was a moralist, who believed that people have a responsibility to the greater good, and that societies and cities exist to bring out the best in people.
Even many liberals -- black and white -- thought that they were too radical. But their actions galvanized a new wave of civil rights protest. But this is how people make history.
The Pope follows in the tradition of Martin Luther King and others in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Keenly aware of the power of southern segregationists, they advanced a politics aimed at winning over the broad middle of American society.
As I argued recently, Pope Francis' climate encyclical, Laudato Si, shows powerful resources in Catholic and other faith traditions for addressing the challenge of climate change. But in immediate terms, it does little to affect the pessimistic public mood.
Although none of these 20 women were elected to office, they all had a great influence on public opinion and public policy. The reformers profiled below exercised influence not only because of the number of people they mobilized, but also because of the moral force of their ideas.
In fact, King was a radical. He believed that America needed a "radical redistribution of economic and political power." He challenged America's class system and its racial caste system.