elysium

However, no one expected what happened next. Despite the tragedy, Turner and his comrades decided to help his brother finish
Hollywood projects our dreams and fears. In the past our cinematic apocalypses have reflected our obsessions with nuclear holocaust and environmental degradation. We're certainly still worried about those fates -- along with pandemics and zombies -- but gross inequality now competes for our attention.
With a film so beloved, I guess it's inevitable that there would be a remake. But instead of being a toothless, needless, sanitized imitation, I'm happy to report that the new RoboCop is willing to make significant changes and swing even harder at its political commentary.
4 - Rush True stories, high stakes, big spectacle, and big funny won the day with this year's movie offerings. Here's a countdown
A lot of stars had lengthy careers with many box office hits. Box office is a rough estimate, sure, even if you adjust for inflation (which I don't). But by some estimates, Tom Hanks has the all-time worldwide box office total.
Were the richest .01 percent to venture out and form their own society, the rest of us would not devolve into violent conflict; rather, without the expensive burden of the wealthy tapeworms siphoning our common wealth, we could begin to solve our problems.
Blomkamp has moved on to bigger and better things with District 9 and Elysium but the question remains -- what if?
As all six of my Facebook fans know, I wrote a blog recently arguing that American movies suck. Not very controversial. Not a single angry comment. No one defending American film.
The Morgan Spurlock-directed documentary has already secured the No. 6 spot on the list of highest-grossing concert movies
Unquestionably the most subversive big-budget film in years, Elysium takes its rightful place among the small number of major productions that dare to hold a mirror up to the rising tide of inequality, injustice and authoritarianism facing us all.
Originally published on VOXXI as The many talents of actor-director Diego Luna Diego Luna dives into ‘Elysium’ Luna started
Andrew Rader, who holds a PhD in aerospace engineering from MIT, said that it's a lot easier to travel to a planet than to
Christ insisted on the oneness of all humanity. And if we truly understand that we are all one, that we are truly brothers and sisters, there would be no yawning chasm in the health care afforded the rich and the poor.
Elysium is for Damon, and the millions of other people living in grinding poverty and chaos on earth below, a place of unobtainable tranquility, hope and salvation. And that is exactly what I came to see America as after a recent trip to Afghanistan where I had the grim task of working for a U.S. government agency tracking Taliban suicide bombers and their targeting patterns.
In accepting the gross income inequality, obscene wealth gap, inexcusable corporate excesses, and blatant political corruption that we do today, we are already laying the groundwork for a real-world Elysium.
The science fiction "Elysium" features a massive, futuristic space station serving as an oasis for humanity. It sounds exotic but the space station's design and science behind is possible. We discuss.
Everything in the film teeters on caricature but ultimately succeeds: it paints a realistic possible future. One we should all seek to avoid at all costs by remembering our humanity.
Do the folks at Tri-Star expect us to buy the idea of a future when only the sheltered rich can afford health care, clean air and safe 'hoods?
Which space race is worth the airfare? Dare we say, maybe both?
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