Email Overload

We all need a digital detox from time to time and my time is now. When I return to work and plug in again after the new year, I will be recharged and more productive; hopefully, I'll be full of great ideas. But right now, I'm stepping back.
Greetings fellow victims of the information apocalypse. It used to be, the goal of Inbox Zero was heroic, but achievable. Alas, that seems like such a long time ago. The rules have changed, and the playing field has changed as well.
Conventional workplace wisdom declares email a daily scourge. We receive too much of it. We spend too much time replying
Some have said that we use ellipses as a way to try to capture the way we speak, with the pauses, lingering and start-and
There is discourse and there is productivity and there is social media and there is life outside work and it adds up to high anxiety.
We live in a culture where email overload is accepted as a fact of professional life -- a post-apocalyptic dystopia of over-stuffed inboxes, vibrating cell phones and never-ending “pings" emanating from our computers and devices.
"You -- the user -- are in control," Hurst said. "The human is the most important part of the system -- not the latest tool
Here's how I help my clients change email behavior -- starting with their own habits, and help others to do the same. If some or all of these are done consistently, you can change the game in your organization.
Email overload may be doing more than driving you crazy -- it could be sending you to an early grave. Research from the University
"My job is very stressful, and I travel endlessly. But the people who work for me are driving me crazy. I hired them to make my life easier but all they do is create more work by filling up my inbox with hundreds of emails daily. What are some healthy tactics to reduce email stress?"
Complaints about email abound. Perhaps you've heard some of these or uttered them in pain yourself: I receive hundreds of