email tips

What's the single greatest interruption that kills your productivity? Most of us are drowning in email, never realizing that the very way we habitually use it has made it much harder to get it back under control.
For many years, I worked for a crazy person. Her name is Lisa, and for a decade she was the worst boss I ever had. I confess; I'm a recovering overbooked entrepreneur, the terrible boss was me.
One additional tip: leave the "TO" field blank until you are ready to send, so you don't accidentally launch the email before you are ready.
Nothing drives people crazier than an email where someone sends over a lot of information but doesn't say what they'd like you to do. I often respond to those immediately by asking: What do you want me to do?
The content of the email is critical. As with the subject line, personalization plays a key factor. Consumers are overloaded and quick to trash anything that feels canned or generic, but making them feel special will typically result in clicks.
From introductions to pitches and proposals, chances are that your initial impression with someone will often be through this medium. Despite the importance of this system, few really take the time to learn it well in order to get better results.
Every night my inbox is completely empty. Yes. Zero emails. For the past 15 years. Without fail. And I'm going to show you how to do it too.
We live in a culture where email overload is accepted as a fact of professional life -- a post-apocalyptic dystopia of over-stuffed inboxes, vibrating cell phones and never-ending “pings" emanating from our computers and devices.
"You -- the user -- are in control," Hurst said. "The human is the most important part of the system -- not the latest tool