embodied cognition

Word aversion has drawn impressive pop-cultural coverage in the last five-or-so years. But despite all the talk of these fairly neutral words that we find so revolting, very little is known about why we can't stand them.
In 2008, a massive earthquake shook the Chinese province of Sichuan. The immediate devastation was followed by a dramatic spike in the divorce rate, a phenomenon that captured international attention -- and sparked widespread speculation -- at the time. Did the deadly earthquake actually cause the jump in marital breakups?
Smile, don't slouch, and don't cross your arms. Your parents probably taught you to use certain body language to appear friendly and polite. But new research shows that your body language does much more than just change the way other people see you -- it can even change how you see yourself. Psychologists describe this phenomenon as "embodied cognition." Just watch the latest video in our Talk Nerdy series above to learn more.
Many of us know that body language is pretty important. After all, it is an effective way of communicating with people around you without using words. But new research shows that your body language does much more than just change the way other people see you -- it can even change how you see yourself. Psychologists describe this phenomenon as "embodied cognition." HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard reports.
Popular advertising depicts that happiness comes in the form of flat abs, wrinkle-free skin or the right clothes that make you cool, hip, and happening. Thankfully, none are necessary for happiness. How about celebrating your body just as it is -- a perfect doorway to happiness?
Many of us have become daily producers/reproducers of cultural content, and it is technology that has made this possible.
And that's not at all. In related experiments, people standing in "expansive poses" were more likely to accept money they
So far, the "Lady Macbeth Effect" has been mostly a curiosity -- a peek at the quirkiness of the not-entirely-rational human mind. But might this scientific insight actually be clinically useful? Tel Aviv University psychological scientist Reuven Dar and his colleagues thought that it might.
There is something deeply repugnant about coming into contact with the clothing of someone we revile. It's as if a killer's evil might rub off on us.
Many health care workers wear a doctor's white lab coat even though they are not physicians. When asked as to why, they uniformly respond that the coat garners respect from patients and colleagues.
Nobody thinks, "Democrats drink more water," or, "Republicans wear warmer clothes." Knowing someone's politics should not affect how cold or thirsty we think they are -- yet these results suggest that it does.
Something as simple as gesturing with alternate hands, or literally getting out of the box, may eliminate unconscious barriers that restrict thinking.
The next time you find yourself at a great concert, let your inner air musician fly. You're just reflecting the way your body wants to understand the music. And when the band tells you to clap, join in. You'll end up feeling much closer to everyone else in the crowd.
Conservative and liberal minds, it appears, may be fundamentally different psychologically, with conservatives much more sensitive to everyday triggers for physical disgust, and much more likely to commingle repulsion and moral judgment.
This is the first study to explore the physical embodiment of virtue. Soap and water can literally salve our guilt, and soften our moral judgments of others.
In one experiment, the strength of blink reflexes to unexpected noises was measured and correlated with degrees of reactions to external threats. Conservatives reacted considerably more strongly than liberals.