embodied cognition

Word aversion has drawn impressive pop-cultural coverage in the last five-or-so years. But despite all the talk of these fairly neutral words that we find so revolting, very little is known about why we can't stand them.
In 2008, a massive earthquake shook the Chinese province of Sichuan. The immediate devastation was followed by a dramatic spike in the divorce rate, a phenomenon that captured international attention -- and sparked widespread speculation -- at the time. Did the deadly earthquake actually cause the jump in marital breakups?
Smile, don't slouch, and don't cross your arms. Your parents probably taught you to use certain body language to appear friendly and polite. But new research shows that your body language does much more than just change the way other people see you -- it can even change how you see yourself. Psychologists describe this phenomenon as "embodied cognition." Just watch the latest video in our Talk Nerdy series above to learn more.
Many of us know that body language is pretty important. After all, it is an effective way of communicating with people around you without using words. But new research shows that your body language does much more than just change the way other people see you -- it can even change how you see yourself. Psychologists describe this phenomenon as "embodied cognition." HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard reports.
Popular advertising depicts that happiness comes in the form of flat abs, wrinkle-free skin or the right clothes that make you cool, hip, and happening. Thankfully, none are necessary for happiness. How about celebrating your body just as it is -- a perfect doorway to happiness?
Many of us have become daily producers/reproducers of cultural content, and it is technology that has made this possible.
Why does this happen? It all boils down to a sense of power, which can be heightened by "expansive" posture, according to
So far, the "Lady Macbeth Effect" has been mostly a curiosity -- a peek at the quirkiness of the not-entirely-rational human mind. But might this scientific insight actually be clinically useful? Tel Aviv University psychological scientist Reuven Dar and his colleagues thought that it might.
There is something deeply repugnant about coming into contact with the clothing of someone we revile. It's as if a killer's evil might rub off on us.