Emergency medicine

Anna E. Condino, MD, MPH Andrew G. Lim, MD, MS Paul W. Charlton, MD, MA Sabiha K. Barot, MD, PhD We can accomplish this by
Did you know that drowning can occur even when a person is out of the water? Pediatric emergency medicine expert Dr. Katherine Leaming-Van Zandt breaks down the processes known as secondary drowning and lets us know what signs we should look out for.
The power to save a life is in your own hands, and this post will walk you through the simple step-by-steps to resuscitating someone who has collapsed and has stopped breathing or is breathing irregularly.
If it's after hours, the recording for any physician or practice of any sort in America will have a message: "If this is an emergency, hang up and dial 911." It's a nice idea. But of course, it presumes that everyone really understands the idea of emergency. In fact, they don't.
Fifty-five years ago this week, braving the cold winds of a winter's January, U.S. President John F. Kennedy delivered his inaugural address imparting upon the American people words still true today.
Today marks Day 2 of the Post-Conflict Colombia and Public Health course -- a project of the Open Hands Initiative and Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI), in collaboration with the University of Antioquia School of Medicine.
Dare we say that despite our hopeful holiday wishes for peace, the present looks grim? How can we begin to heal? Where does peace begin?
Mark Palm thinks he knows what Jesus might do if he were a pilot. He might climb into the left seat of a Cessna 206 Amphibian and fly the 700 mile long Sepik River in Papua, New Guinea helping transport the sick to the region's only hospital.
It's easy to condemn what we don't understand or would never do ourselves. But maybe we should pause to consider the messages that tattoos are sending. In the process, we might love and understand our neighbors just a little better than before.
The medical pundits are wagging fingers and lecturing everyone about how best to manage this crisis. (Lecturing, that is, from the relative calm and safety of television studios, rather than the in the mind-numbing chaos of the ER.)
An MRI here, a prescription there -- these are Band-Aids, not lasting solutions. Our communities need innovative approaches to pressing issues like homelessness, drug addiction, obesity, and lack of mental health services. To help the patient, we must also address the health of the community.
On April 15, 2013, I woke up at 5:30 a.m. and walked to Mass General Hospital to begin my ER shift. It was the day of Boston marathon, and we were prepared for the usual influx of people with heatstroke and dehydration. Just before 3 p.m., we received the call that nobody could have predicted.
Meaning no disrespect, but the question is kind of like asking, "what does a sandwich taste like?" There are so many possible
As we celebrate this year's Nurses Week, I am reminded of the Hippocrates saying that the goal of medicine is "to cure sometimes, to relieve often, to comfort always." This, too, I learn through daily example from the amazing nurses I work with.
It is worth noting that the tremendous human costs of the war in Iraq would have been much greater, were it not for breakthroughs in combat medicine deployed for the first time on a broad scale in Iraq.
Imagine if that tiny print on prescription bottles could be heard instead of squinted at. Voice-guided instructions may indeed be helpful to patients in every age population, with a variety of medical needs.
One of the wonderful things about knowledge and training is that they are inherently renewable resources. Unlike drugs and equipment, knowledge never has a stock-out, never breaks down, and never stops working when the power goes out.
Policymakers should be aware that even well-informed patients with good access to primary care need the ER. Legislation should aim to increase availability of primary care, but not penalize for use of emergency services.
A heart-breaking tale that will have you hugging your children and, I suspect, second guessing your doctor then next time your own child gets sick.
Originally published on Turnstylenews.com, a digital information service surfacing emerging stories in news, entertainment