emergency rooms

Don't make people find the data -- make the data find the people.
There's an epidemic in America that's not getting the attention it deserves: hospital closures. The situation is so dire that, according to the American Medical Association, almost one third of all emergency rooms in the country have closed since the mid-nineties.
We have made progress but there is more to do. We ask you and your colleagues to continue to work toward creating the kinds of equal and inclusive workplaces envisioned with the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
In the coming years of health-care transition, county-hospital ERs will continue to be the first refuge for America's marginalized and vulnerable populations. They must evolve to become coordinating centers for society's health needs and champions of cost reform.
Already, beds for patients have fallen from a rate of 358 per 100,000 people four years ago to about 330 beds per 100,000
Here are a few important and often unrecognized considerations that patients and their families should be aware of when discussing code status with their health care team.
Policymakers should be aware that even well-informed patients with good access to primary care need the ER. Legislation should aim to increase availability of primary care, but not penalize for use of emergency services.
The children became known as “stuck kids.” In 2004, Mary Ann Tufts had taken her three adopted daughters, who were struggling
The Waiting Room is a punch to the gut, an unblinking gaze at the real lives of people cast off and left out of the medical system in the U.S. Shot in cinema verité style, the film takes place entirely in the emergency room at Oakland's Highland Hospital.
NYU's Langone Medical Center sent 12-year-old Rory Staunton, now deceased, home in March and then failed to notify his doctor or family of lab results showing he was suffering from a raging infection.