emergent church

I come to praise alternative worship, not to bury it... No, I have not turned over my blog to a guest who is about to refute everything I've said advocating traditional worship-this is really me.
What Conservative Christians are really upset about, deep down, is not that one or a few or dozens or hundreds of their fold are being attracted by liturgical traditions and progressive theology. What they are really upset about is that their ways and their positions of privilege in the world are dying.
It's not right to co-opt a term that has been used for several generations to define a theological movement for your own benefit. And it's especially not right to do it when you are not familiar with, or not willing to honor, the values that progressive Christianity has been trying to model for the larger church for years.
Why was Marcus Borg an ally for those of us who look for, and seek to bring about, a more just and generous Christianity?
There's a growing dissatisfaction with the traditional view of the church among emerging generations. This dissatisfaction has any number of causes, which the disaffected would name as anti-institutionalism, hypocrisy, judgmentalism, etc. But there's one area of vexation that always seems to come up: the Jesus Gap.
A vision for a coworking space has come into focus at St. Lydia's, the Dinner Church where I am pastor.
If you're seeking a fresh way to experience and practice your faith, if you're a long-term Christian seeking new vitality, or if you feel out of place in traditional church circles, Brian's new book will be sure to inspire and activate you in your spiritual journey.
Last Saturday was the day set aside for the annual festival commemorating "The Conversion of St. Paul." Did anyone notice? Still, Paul is "all over the place" in Christianity. Almost everything about him evokes or signals conflict.
The new pope seems to be signaling is a commitment to following Jesus down the dark alleys of the human journey, in spite of the fact that most of the rest of the religious world appears too busy protecting the 16-lane super highways we built to accommodate the long-since-died-down-increase in traffic.
It's a perfect time to get equipped for missional living and service in the neighborhood for the summer and all year long.
I realize that when I use the word God, there's a good chance I'm stepping on all kinds of land mines. Is there a more volatile word loaded down with more history, assumptions and expectations than that tired, old, relevant, electrically charged, provocative, fresh, antiquated yet ubiquitous as ever word God?
These folks don't carry much (or any) political clout.  No one in D.C. is listening to them. They don't have the deep pockets or White House access like the older more conservative clan does.  So no one hears their voices.
Bell doesn't have to call himself a liberal or anything else, short of lover of Jesus. But it might be wise to reach out in a new way to people who have been his partners even before he preached his first sermon.
Life In The Trinity Ministries, where Brian McLaren is the "Resident Theologian," proposed this question as their conference theme this past weekend here in Fort Worth. In the latest episode of "Outlaw Theology," McLaren answers.
While the emergent Christians are endeavoring to re-imagine the way we engage faith, one another and the world differently, the movement still is dependent on human beings. As such, we tend to screw it up.
If Machiavelli had written "The Pastor" instead of "The Prince," what kind of ruthlessly practical advice might he have offered to someone trying to become a famous religious figure?
Whether or not upper-middle-class Americans choose simple living, activism and following Christ, we'll always be choosing, and that colors our theology. But some folks don't have a choice.