emirates airlines

The company's dizzying growth trajectory is bumping into slowing demand in many of the regions that have been the foundation
After months of deliberation, the U.S. Department of State on Monday confirmed media reports that the Obama administration has resisted pressure from the Big Three U.S. airlines (American, Delta and United) to dismantle the aviation policy known as Open Skies.
The management of Emirates Airline, which is based in Dubai, have achieved a great deal in the 30 years they've stewarded the company from start up to world domination.
We are living in a time of great social shifts and as a result great cultural and social movements.
The fair trade movement and concern about ethical sourcing asks consumers, all of us, to think more carefully about what we buy, and to ask hard questions about how producers behave. Air travelers who believe they are people of good will, people who embrace the Golden Rule, should ask the same question when booking a trip.
As we enter a new year, massive subsidies to the Gulf airlines - Emirates, Etihad Airways, and Qatar Airways - continue, while
The U.S. airlines' effort to "prove it" gained yet more momentum this week with the release of a new study by the respected
It's time for the Obama administration to act. Failure to act will put the U.S. airlines, their workers, communities across the country that rely on service and the entire American aviation industry in serious jeopardy.
One of the fibs that the Gulf airlines and their supporters keep repeating is that U.S. airlines are being "protectionist," which couldn't be further from the truth. American, Delta, and United don't need protection from competition.
If you're Emirates, based in Dubai, Etihad from Abu Dhabi, or Qatar Airways from that country, you can install showers, butlers and bars on your A380s because your government owners deliver wheelbarrows of subsidy cash.
Last month, I spent two weeks teaching grad students about a variety of airline topics in Switzerland, Germany, and Sweden, and after nearly every lecture someone has asked about the impact of the three fast-growing Gulf mega-airlines, Emirates, Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways.
Is all the hype -- and fear -- justified? Are they that much better than Delta, American, United, Lufthansa, Air France/KLM, and the rest?
Six months into the trade dispute between the massively subsidized Gulf airlines -- Emirates, Etihad Airways, and Qatar Airways -- and U.S. network carriers, the tactics of the two sides have become familiar.
Open Skies agreements have served U.S. carriers very well, enabling them to grow overseas, and to partner with European and Asian airlines to expand their networks. But U.S. airlines cannot - and should not have to - compete with airlines with short paths to enormous government treasuries.
U.S. airlines have learned to compete in a global marketplace. They ask no special favors; only that our government provide equal opportunity to compete, and act to control airlines that could not exist without enormous and ongoing state capitalism.
Our government needs to heed this threat to the U.S. airline grid, to domestic economic objectives, and to good-paying U.S. jobs. As someone who worked in the U.S. airline business for 25 years, I know firsthand that American, Delta, and United can compete, but not on a playing field rigged by limitless resources
We may have the best barbecue ribs and baseball teams, but when it comes to airlines, the United States has fallen slightly behind. The latest Skytrax World Airline Awards, which rank global airlines in a number of categories, are out.