emotion regulation

Business leaders today work under conditions of serious stress related to rapid technological change, global competition, uncertain market conditions, regulatory requirements, and other complex realities.
Step Three: Envision a Worst-Case Scenario Often, people say they would die if they became too embarrassed. Newsflash: Nobody
The good news? With awareness and practice, we can recognize when these beliefs are getting in our way and work around them. Here are four reasons we struggle with "sorry":
It can help you to better regulate your emotions, a new study suggests.
Meditative practices performed in isolation can help us recognize and process our emotional states, but true healing lies in those most vulnerable moments, when someone looks us in the eye, sees our pain and provides us with the mirror we so deeply seek.
Awareness and Commitments as Antidote to Auto-Pilot Behavior Getting the change we want in ourselves and others is no easy
Emotionally immature parents will drive you crazy if you mistake their physical age for psychological maturity. Acknowledge that you may have surpassed them developmentally a long time ago, and their insensitivities will begin to hurt a little less.
There are days now where my consciousness absorbs me. There are hours where the line is blurred between who I am and what I am doing or seeing or thinking. I find difficulty in distinguishing the point I finish and the place my understandings start.
With practice we can learn that fighting the waves of emotion does not serve us and we are more able to mindfully choose the most effective responses to the tides of life.
Since Babylonian times, we've been paying our respects to Janus, the two-headed, past-perusing, future-swivelling god of doorways and bridges, borders and movement, time and transitions, receptivity, transformation, and change.
Ultimately, good behavior depends on the development of a moral identity -- a child's inner sense of him or her self as a good and helpful person.
We want children to have their feelings, but not be overwhelmed by them -- to feel discouraged but not give up; to feel anxious but not stay home; and to be excited but not get so carried away in their enthusiasm that they use poor judgment in making decisions.
When left unattended, strong emotions can lead to destructive behaviors. Attending to times that you feel hurt, belittled, let down, disrespected, insulted or threatened is key to dealing with the anger that often comes from those experiences.
If you've ever been threatened and felt that rush of strength and energy that made you more physically capable than you have been at other times, then you've experienced the body's stress response.
DBT skills are flexible and can be used to help with self-esteem issues, other emotional problems, and simply to help you live a healthier, happier life.
The main reasons DBT is so effective in such a wide range of problems, is that it teaches people to manage their overwhelming emotions more effectively.