Enemy

Here's the gist: If used correctly, scapegoating can be a powerful tool for resisting temptation and sticking to hard goals
If Donald Trump can thrive politically by throwing meat to the American id, what else is possible? How about the opposite?
Say whatever else you want to about 2014, here's one thing I know for sure. It had 365 days. And since new movies opened on screens across the USA on a great many of those days, I feel compelled to consider the year in films.
The fact is that people and their individual initiatives have much more impact on the course of history than is acknowledged by government officials, by cynics, and by those citizens too apathetic, too callous, or too fearful to act.
Jason Bateman makes his directing debut with Bad Words, the rudest comedy about an adult dealing with kids since Bad Santa.
I mean, this is, like, we can talk, talk, whatever. Fuck. But you see Matthew McConaughey and the work that he's done, particularly
The Courmayeur Noir in Festival is an event that appears to go beyond the typical film festival format. Surrounded by sidebar conversations, exhibits and featuring a work in progress alongside titles by mainstream filmmakers, the festival has gained a following worthy of the noir genre.
Did it surprise you that it sold so quickly? To be honest with you, "Enemy," Jake and I, when we were doing the movie together
Denis Villeneuve had two films at this year's Toronto Film Festival. The better one was called Enemy. The one that's getting the big studio release this week is called Prisoners.
The Pulitzer Prize-winning stage play about a dysfunctional Oklahoma family coping with the suicide of clan's patriarch translates well to the screen -- in the sense that I didn't feel like I was watching a recorded play. Though, it's certainly a performance film. So much scenery is chewed between Meryl Streep (as Violet, the bitter mother), Julia Roberts, Chris Cooper, Ewan McGregor and Benedict Cumberbatch, that the title of this movie could have been called August: Bubble Yum. Yet, even with all of those heavy hitters on board, Dermot Mulroney somehow manages to steal every one of his scenes.