english soccer

The summer has been full of transfer speculation already and we still have over a month until the transfer window closes and all these moves beg the same question -- who will win the title?
If NBC wants Americans to watch English soccer they must make Americans come to identify with soccer. It's going to take more than stunts, viral videos and general "awareness advertising."
Sam Sodje of Portsmouth was a sore loser. Jose Baxter of Oldham was probably a sore winner. There's also the occasional plunk
Harry Redknapp sails to the rescue. His latest mission is at the wheel of the fast sinking Queens Park Rangers. The club is listing badly, in last place in the English Premier league, winless, rudderless and everything seeming hopeless. No luck with the breeze. Harry brings the wind.
Corruption pervades, money talks, the players live in ivory towers, ticket prices keep out the poor, the servants in Downton Abbey are treated better by their masters. Let the England coach be chosen by a referendum of the fans!
Thankfully, for soccer fans in America, Morgan has taken up punditry as a moonlighting gig on the Fox Soccer Channel. He comes to it like a shark.
The Barclays English Premier League kicks off on August 13th, which means one thing for armchair soccer fanatics: it’s time
Stars fade, and for England, unless the primordial chemistry of football ignites tomorrow, English soccer faces the black hole.
American soccer's Anglophilia always has and always will confuse me. Take one listen to ESPN analyst and former U.S.-team star John Harkes, and you'll hear it in his lilt; that weird accent of his wasn't cultivated in his childhood home near Newark, New Jersey.
John Terry, a married father of two, has just felt the crunching chop of Britain's vicious tabloids for his sex romp with a former teammate's girlfriend. The man looked broken.