enhanced interrogation techniques

She repeatedly refused to weigh in on its morality at her confirmation hearing.
Cheney's comments come as lawmakers have scrutinized CIA director nominee Gina Haspel for her role in overseeing the controversial program.
The three men at the heart of the case were beaten, held in coffin-sized boxes, and hung from metal rods.
The injuries that resulted from the government's "excessive force" have gone untreated.
Finally: Last week, after a ten-year internal struggle, the American Psychological Association voted to ban its member psychologists from any involvement in national security interrogations and, more to the point, in torture.
The Best Idea for 2014 was requiring police to wear body cameras. This idea was so good it actually cut across the lines of the protestors and the supporters of police. Many on both sides of that divide support the idea, for what boils down to the same reason: the camera doesn't lie.
Mr. Obama, in ruling out prosecution for torture, may have thought he spared us bother, but actually he did us harm. By casting accountability into limbo, he makes possible government-sponsored torture in the future and prevents America from recovering the thing most precious: our good name.
The issue is not whether torture works or does not. I believe it does not work. But any cruel and unusual punishment is destructive to the legitimacy and credibility of American values. The Bush 43 White House should have known better.
"OPINION is the governing principle of human affairs. Korea" -- Alexander Hamilton WHERE ARE MY KEYS? I can't find my glasses
Be shocked, be disgusted, be appalled, but don't be fooled. Mainstream coverage of U.S. torture in general, and of this new report in particular, rests on three false assumptions.
How should we rank order the following in terms of their importance in how we want our government to behave: morally; legally, constitutionally, effectively? Of course, we want all these things, but when push comes to shove, as it does for an individual government worker in the CIA, a government agency, and a nation, what matters most?
If US officials tortured people, and we know torture is, was and always has been illegal, why isn't the government prosecuting them? Maybe there's some complicated legal reason that isn't obvious to most of us why the evidence wouldn't hold up in court. If so, it's in the government's interest to explain what that is.
The international community and human rights advocates cheered the president's forceful statement. But within the CIA, the
President Obama's condemnation of torture during a White House press conference last Friday was welcome news for longtime critics of the U.S.' policy of torturing detainees in the immediate post-9/11 years.
If the White House intends to fair, everything should be out in the open so Americans can make their own judgments.