Entomophagy

“It’s not that they’re dirty and disgusting so we don’t eat them; it’s that we don’t eat them, so we think of them as dirty and disgusting.”
Insects are packed with proteins, minerals, and healthy fats. They're important pollinators. Compared to other forms of animal agriculture, raising certain species of insects in appropriate conditions takes just a fraction of the food, water, and land.
Bugs takes a topic that might ordinarily make the squeamish quite queasy and instead, with intelligence and some humor, allows us to identify with the hardships we and our world will have to overcome both in the present and even more direly in the future.
"It was the first time I organized an insect eating event in a restaurant like this," Jiskra said, "but the outcome was so
Eating insects is a hot topic and has been receiving lots of media attention lately which helps spread awareness. But more research needs to be done to develop the insect-rearing processes.
"Entomophagy is an evolving term in need of review," says Afton Marina Szasz Halloran, Ph.D Fellow at the University of Copenhagen. Halloran calls for a change in the way we speak about edible insects and entomophagy.
That is, at least, according to a couple of New York filmmakers.
“Just know the demand is there now,” Bachhuber said. “We’re starting to see shifts in peoples’ minds after we started telling
Wait, just hear us out. Insects could be the next big thing in food.
Before you call this video gross, or trendy, or sensationalist...watch it. David Gracer, an entomophagy (bug eating) expert gives a pretty good case for making wider use of bugs.