E.O. Wilson

Stephen Hawking is among those who say the GOP nominee could prove disastrous for the planet.
Famed conservationist E.O. Wilson says climate change is a threat. But he also worries about the Republican nominee and people with nuclear codes.
I concur with the New York Times editorialists who, among others, declared President Obama’s speech in Dallas this week a
Maybe it's because the word refers to the ultimate oblivion, or maybe it's because most of us think of polar bears stranded on melting icebergs when we hear about "extinction," but many of us assume the curtailing of life forever is a remote phenomenon.
We're focusing on the nonliving, physical environment. "But Earth's living environment, including all its species and all the ecosystems they compose," is receiving little attention.
The meaning of our personal lives, then, is not found in the intentions of a benevolent creator, but in facts about our evolutionary
Nature and Culture's approach to conservation is a California one. Engelhorn calls it entrepreneurial. It's the way he's used to doing business, and it may be changing the way well-intentioned gringos relate to Latin America and the rest of the world.
It made me feel more confident that I can accomplish my personal goal of helping my fellow Americans wake up to the realization that nature is the expression of the "God" we claim to love, and that we have an urgent responsibility to address the damage we've caused.
We're living in the bloodiest century in human history, and our own, daily habits are to blame. That's good news. It means we can do something about it.
The forests that produce our oxygen are in turn dependent on animal species that are sustained by them, and pay it back in various ways, such as by dispersing seeds. The vast interdependence of life is a bedrock principle of biology, from bees to buffalo to banyan trees. As glaciers melt and sea levels rise, our fellow species and we will sink or swim together.