equal justice initiative

The actor is playing Equal Justice Initiative founder Bryan Stevenson, who has fought for the wrongly condemned and convicted for decades.
An HBO documentary about Bryan Stevenson sounds an urgent call to examine the nation's past, from slavery to lynching.
“If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” This joke has a Mississippi senator in hot water.
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice draws a line from the slavery and lynching of the past to the criminal justice system of today.
[2] http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/01/opinion/condemned-to-die-because-hes-black.html A generation from now I believe our
From Ferguson, Missouri, to Charleston, South Carolina, communities are suffering the lethal consequences of our collective silence about racial injustice. The church should be a source of truth in a nation that has lost its way. As the dominant religion in the United States, Christianity is directly implicated when we Christians fail to speak more honestly about the legacy of racial inequality.
"All of a sudden, I knew I wanted to help condemned people get to higher ground," says Bryan Stevenson.
State officials in New York are reforming their policy of keeping people convicted of non-violent offenses in solitary confinement. Some hail the decision; others, including corrections officers, object, saying that solitary confinement is necessary to maintain control, and they say that keeping an individual in solitary confinement is not inhumane.
It's not about, "Does this person deserve to die?" says attorney Bryan Stevenson.
"You can't get mercy unless you give it."
We must wake up, open our eyes and ears, avoid convenient ignorance, seek the truth, speak up, stand up, and never give up fighting for justice for all. How long?
South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, one of the world's leading peace and justice advocates, has called Bryan Stevenson "America's Nelson Mandela." He has gotten innocent men off death row, successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court multiple times, including to ban "death sentences."
The punitive reactions against a few individuals or an isolated fraternity chapter are no more effective than any other punitive measures taken against scapegoats. They shut the door on something unpleasant, in the process heaping blame on isolated individuals that ought to be borne, or at least processed, collectively.
One recent event held by the Osborne Association, an organization that the Foundation supports, really opened my eyes on the need to offer assistance to both incarcerated individuals and their families.
The Alabama Department of Corrections, meanwhile, has underreported sexual misconduct at the prison in official reports, according