equal justice initiative

The Equal Justice Initiative documented racial terror lynchings during the post-emancipation Reconstruction era, from 1865 to 1876.
The actor is playing Equal Justice Initiative founder Bryan Stevenson, who has fought for the wrongly condemned and convicted for decades.
An HBO documentary about Bryan Stevenson sounds an urgent call to examine the nation's past, from slavery to lynching.
“If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” This joke has a Mississippi senator in hot water.
The National Memorial for Peace and Justice draws a line from the slavery and lynching of the past to the criminal justice system of today.
[1] Equal Justice Initiative, "Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror," 21. In the case of Duane Buck
From Ferguson, Missouri, to Charleston, South Carolina, communities are suffering the lethal consequences of our collective silence about racial injustice. The church should be a source of truth in a nation that has lost its way. As the dominant religion in the United States, Christianity is directly implicated when we Christians fail to speak more honestly about the legacy of racial inequality.
"All of a sudden, I knew I wanted to help condemned people get to higher ground," says Bryan Stevenson.
State officials in New York are reforming their policy of keeping people convicted of non-violent offenses in solitary confinement. Some hail the decision; others, including corrections officers, object, saying that solitary confinement is necessary to maintain control, and they say that keeping an individual in solitary confinement is not inhumane.
It's not about, "Does this person deserve to die?" says attorney Bryan Stevenson.