erik spoelstra

Multiple pit stops in the D-League, China and Lebanon failed to derail the 26-year-old center.
The Miami Heat star also talks about the challenges and advantages of post-LeBron life.
The Thunder surrendered a first-round pick in the Enes Kanter deal, which is a lot to give up for a team that has built through
The one guy for the Spurs who can change this series is Kawhi Leonard -- nobody else on the roster can defend LeBron James that well. But what Leonard did in Game 3 was not only bother James (22 points and seven turnovers) as well as force him to use screens for offense, but also completely take over the game offensively. Leonard -- who, ironically, hails from Los Angeles and went unrecruited by the LA schools before going to San Diego State -- scored a career-high 29 points on 10-13 shooting.
It took less than a full quarter of the first game of the NBA Finals to see how the rest of the series between Miami and San Antonio will go: Coach Gregg Popovich wants his team to control the pace of play at all costs.
Statistics don't lie, but at the same time, defending the Heat requires superb levels of individual and help efforts because
Games 1 and 2 of the Eastern Conference Finals, in which the Miami Heat squared off against the Indiana Pacers, were indicative
Before the Miami Heat beat the Brooklyn Nets to advance to the Eastern Conference Finals, Heat coach Erik Spoelstra sat down
Tim Duncan may not run and jump like a gazelle anymore, but his spry 27 point performance in San Antonio's 90-85 Game 1 victory
Game 6 of the NBA Finals was such a seesaw battle of emotions and just sheer basketball that nobody, perhaps not even the San Antonio or Miami players, knew what Game 7 would bring us. And, after a two-point Heat lead at halftime where a series of jabs and hooks were thrown, LeBron James and Dwyane Wade offered a solution: Play like the superstars they are.
Heading into Game 7, we are faced with a litany of questions -- namely centered around why Popovich subbed out Tim Duncan and Tony Parker late in Game 6; how in the world the league's most consistent team and well-run organization choked away a surefire win; and whether or not either one of these teams has anything left in the tank. Maybe, though, the question we should be asking is what will Dwyane Wade provide for the Heat, because lightning won't strike the same place twice.
With the San Antonio Spurs leading the NBA Finals 3 games to 2, the question becomes, can Spoelstra respond? Will he stay with a smaller lineup, or will he re-insert Chris Andersen for some much-needed shot blocking?
Wade is averaging the fewest minutes, points, field goal attempts and, perhaps most telling, free throw attempts of his nine playoff appearances.
The Miami Heat's Game 3 showing of the NBA Finals was so awful it could serve as a 48-minute guide of how not to play basketball. Lazy closeouts? Check. The Spurs made a Finals record 16 3-pointers. Poor effort on the glass? Check. The Spurs out-rebounded the Heat 52-36. A starting five who didn't show up? Check. Danny Green and Gary Neal combined for 51 points, yet all five Heat starters combined for 43.
Neal knocked down back-to-back three-pointers to start the fourth quarter, giving the Spurs a 21-point lead. After that, Green
If James lets the defense define his style and refuses to impose his will, the Heat must continue to rely on perimeter shooting to win this series.
Perhaps the more interesting element to this matchup is how Wade defends Green's superior jump shot. As an elite catch-and
LeBron James, in Game 5 Thursday night, showed Frank Vogel and the Pacers why people like to say players, not coaches, win championships.