esea

When Dr. King stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1963, he sounded a call to the thousands gathered there and to
Policies that excuse everyone but teachers for the poor conditions in which an increasing share of US children grow up have not improved achievement, and they appear to be helping gaps grow, if anything.
I was proud to be on hand today as President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act into law, which includes a provision I authored to encourage the wider adoption of the full-service community schools model.
After years of trying, Congress is finally on the verge of rewriting the 2002 law.
Education is the most important thing I can provide for my three daughters. But it is not enough for me to know that they are learning; I need to know that they are achieving.
Let's treat social, economic, and education policies as the innately interwoven drivers of children's school and life trajectories that they are. And let's start putting them all on the right track.
Accountability is not just rhetoric -- nor is it just a slogan. It is a promise to our children and their parents that schools will quickly identify students who need an extra hand and intervene when necessary.
Forty years later, it is clear that the original intent of the ESEA has still not been met for too many children, especially children with disabilities.
With Congress poised to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), originally passed as part of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, organizations from a broad range of perspectives are claiming the civil rights mantle in promoting their visions for the new bill.
The current congressional debate for reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the law which determines federal policy for public schools, is certain to create new opportunities for businesses and may even create new roadblocks.