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Policies that excuse everyone but teachers for the poor conditions in which an increasing share of US children grow up have not improved achievement, and they appear to be helping gaps grow, if anything.
I was proud to be on hand today as President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act into law, which includes a provision I authored to encourage the wider adoption of the full-service community schools model.
After years of trying, Congress is finally on the verge of rewriting the 2002 law.
Education is the most important thing I can provide for my three daughters. But it is not enough for me to know that they are learning; I need to know that they are achieving.
Let's treat social, economic, and education policies as the innately interwoven drivers of children's school and life trajectories that they are. And let's start putting them all on the right track.
Accountability is not just rhetoric -- nor is it just a slogan. It is a promise to our children and their parents that schools will quickly identify students who need an extra hand and intervene when necessary.
Forty years later, it is clear that the original intent of the ESEA has still not been met for too many children, especially children with disabilities.
With Congress poised to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), originally passed as part of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, organizations from a broad range of perspectives are claiming the civil rights mantle in promoting their visions for the new bill.
The current congressional debate for reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), the law which determines federal policy for public schools, is certain to create new opportunities for businesses and may even create new roadblocks.
In fall 2016, Jamillah will leave her Head Start classroom to begin kindergarten in a suburb of Washington, DC. Like many of her Head Start classmates, she is a tiny bundle of joy and curiosity; she loves colored pencils and books of all sorts, and adores singing the alphabet song.
When Estefania first came to Lincoln Elementary School in Lehigh Valley, PA, she struggled to speak English and to participate in school. But now, she's an enthusiastic, engaged student who's taken on leadership roles and mentoring younger students.
Republicans are clear. The GOP wants to unleash the same unregulated market forces on education that brought us stagnating wages, accelerating inequality and increasing school segregation. Here is the short stump speech I wish the Democratic candidates would give.
With the reauthorization of the absurd and dysfunctional NCLB, we have a chance to once again let teachers teach and let students learn. We have a chance to ignite their imaginations, encourage them to reach their full potential, and expand their world view beyond filling in bubble tests with a #2 pencil.
I call on the Senate to include provisions in the Every Child Achieves Act that would provide states and districts the capacity and necessary resources to support effective family engagement strategies in every school to help every child succeed academically and reach his or her full potential.
If we are to achieve true equality as President Johnson envisioned half a century ago, then we must ensure that students from low-income communities are given the necessary resources and supports. For the civil rights community, accountability must be at the forefront of our actions.
Emerging research, powerful insights from the field, and promising innovations have created a powerful moment in time to have a meaningful dialogue about how we make a real difference for students who need it most.
If a low-income child is trapped in a school that has been failing its children for years, shouldn't someone in a responsible position act to intervene?
Like many educators, Craig Gfeller doesn't like every provision in federal education law. But as principal of a high-poverty school in the exurbs of Washington, D.C., he considers a couple of them critical for his students.