ethan coen

The Joel and Ethan Coen's movie spoof on Hollywood types, "Hail, Caesar!," is ripe with dozens of wink-wink-nudge-nudge Easter Eggs and references to real-world Hollywood scandals and events from the Golden Age of the Silver Screen. If you know what to look for, you'll find enough Tinseltown references and mashups to fill the Hollywood Bowl. So let's get digging, shall we?
The Coens' latest film Hail, Caesar! has the brothers returning to some of their favorite territory: kidnappings, old Hollywood, and the screwball comedy. And, as usual, it's a Coen brothers film through and through.
The profane, bowling ball-licking, hairnet-wearing maniac fleshed out by Turturro for the 1998 film was based on a real person, according to the actor who received the John Cassavetes Award at the Denver Film Festival on Nov 12.
Jan Donovan Amorosi had just seen Steven Spielberg's Bridge of Spies at a special screening the night before its New York Film Festival premiere at Alice Tully Hall on Sunday night. "We had no idea what our father had gone through when we were growing up in Brooklyn."
Newfound fame and adulation might be dizzying -- "We're trying not to let it overwhelm us," Price said over the phone as the wheels kept turning -- but Lake Street Dive is grounded enough to realize what it means to finally stand in the on-deck circle with home run potential.
What happens to a musician when desperation overshadows inspiration? The atmospheric new film Inside Llewyn Davis, written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, tracks a grieving folk singer-songwriter in search of his Muse -- or any Muse.
Recently, when I sat down with the Coen Brothers in Beverly Hills to ask why they'd chosen to tell Llewyn's story rather than that of, say, a Dylan-like figure (i.e., a first-rate artist surrounded by lesser talents), both Coens seemed genuinely surprised by the question.
After being outsiders, the Coens are in the strange position of having critics seemingly tripping over each other to lionize whatever they do -- and I feel like that's what might be happening with their latest film Inside Llewyn Davis.
We are awash in films examining the Beats and the roots of the generation shift that occurred from the late 1950s through the 1960s - but none with a clearer eye than Joel and Ethan Coen's Inside Llewyn Davis.
The Origin T Bone Burnett: It's not a joke song -- it's dead serious. It's mean to provide levity -- those are the hardest
Inside Llewyn Davis plays out like a prayer sung in the freezing dark of night to a bright, warm future morning to come. It is the story of a man left out in the cold with only his guitar and his songs.
Good news. I'm not crazy ... at least, not totally crazy. John Goodman cleared that up for me.
The Hill Town plays collectively are an epic portrait of rural poverty, displaced love, and the boundless angst that can propel someone into a different life while leaving a fragmented past behind.
Susan Pourfar is used to playing out of the ordinary roles. She earned an array of awards for her portrayal of Sylvia in the Nina Raine comedy-drama play Tribes. You'll recognize her from her recurring role as Becky Flynn on ABC's hit series, Scandal.
When a play ends and the audience is caught short -- uncertain of whether to applaud -- it's a clear sign the show is one or two drafts away from being ready. That's certainly the case for Ethan Coen's first full-length play.
Inside Llewyn Davis is a compassionate reminder of how hard it is to be an artist, and of the great legacy musicians leave behind. At the end of the day, when a civilization is assessed with the clarity of historical perspective, it is the arts that most define it: architecture, painting, plays, philosophy, music.