Eucharist

The Rev. Richard Bucci declares that Rhode Island lawmakers who backed an abortion rights bill can't serve as godparents.
A directive from the Roman Catholic Church clarifies its rules on the Eucharist host.
A mixture of perfume and stale cigarette smoke hung in the air. Breakfast dishes lay jumbled in the sink atop several night’s
Perhaps no other passage of Scripture has contributed more to pious anxiety than what Paul wrote about the Eucharist in his first letter to the Corinthians, "For he who eats and drinks in an unworthy manner eats and drinks judgment upon himself..." (1 Cor. 11.29).
For Jesus, a dedicated practicing Jew, Passover was a seminal event. Although the Gospels do not give us a fully developed biography of Jesus, they do make it clear that Passover looms large in his life.
The first of Jesus's temptations in the wilderness is often seen as Jesus overcoming sins of the flesh. Jesus has mastery over his body, and we should all be strong like that and not give in to our fleshly desires, right?
The rear door of the chapel opened, and in came a man wearing a chef's hat and pushing a food cart loaded with hot dogs and beer. Coming down the center aisle, he called out in a loud voice: "Free food!" To me, that's what Communion is all about.
Exactly when did the change in terminology occur, what was the reason for the change, is it helpful for the family of the deceased, and what are the theological implications of using "passed away" or "passed" instead of "died"? I decided to explore the matter.
How do we know what we are vs. what we are becoming, what can change vs. what can't? The words from today's Eucharist do not offer hard and fast answers. They do, however, draw from the treasure trove of Christian tradition to speak to our universal condition:
We, as Americans, rightly hold to our freedom of speech and expression, but civility and goodwill, indeed those things by virtue of which we can cry out "We the People" in establishing those rights, demand more of us.