european history

The Reformation is one of the great and dramatic instances of human difference: "Christians" in the sixteenth did not agree on what the word meant, what it entailed for a person trying to live it, and they killed one another over the content of the word.
Alexander von Humboldt was one of the greatest scientists of his time, a world-renowned figure for his many scientific discoveries, a revolutionary in his philosophical endeavors, a superb and extremely prolific writer and a friend and mentor to many other greats, not the least of whom were Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Thomas Jefferson, Simón Bolívar and Charles Darwin.
Greece had to be saved. It had to be saved from that growing segment of European opinion that was sick of seeing a member country place its own legitimacy over that of 18 other members. It had to be saved from itself and from the sentiment that Greece was being prescribed remedies that were akin to a cup of hemlock. But most of all, it had to be saved -- imperatively -- for three reasons.
"Study history, study history," espoused Sir Winston Churchill. "In history lies all the secrets of statecraft." At the 200th anniversary of Iron Chancellor and Prussian statesman Otto von Bismarck, the hidden lessons from this remarkable statesman remain ever vital for the future of Europe.
Many Americans travel to historic battlefields, most typically sites in which we have a direct emotional stake: places where U.S. soldiers fought at home or abroad and where a piece of our history was made.
The title of Taber's book, with its emphasis on the Nazi thefts, doesn't do his tale justice.