every child achieves act

My first thought was about the fate of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), the latest version of which is the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB).
As a nation, it behooves us to consider how we prioritize various learning experiences. As millions of high school students leap through the hoops and hurdles of the next 9 months of the school year, we must look beyond short-term gains in specific skills and knowledge toward their longer term needs and desires.
Eight years after the nation's major education law expired, we might finally be getting a new one.
In July 2015, both House and Senate passed bills to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965. The House version is known as the Student Success Act (SSA); the Senate version is called the Every Child Achieves Act (ECAA) of 2015.
Many years ago, when I was a special education teacher, I had a summer job at a residential school for emotionally disturbed children. The school happened to be located in a former tuberculosis sanitarium.
In the House version of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, the Student Success Act (SSA), parental opt-out is written into the legislation, bypassing any state positions on the issue:
Through the union, educators are raising our collective voice. Together with parents and students, educators are turning the tide. Teaching is our heart. Our students are our soul. And the union is our spine. When educators raise their voice and their power, we can reclaim the promise of public education.
“I commend the hard work of Senator Alexander, Senator Murray, and their colleagues to get us this far,” U.S. Secretary of
In fall 2016, Jamillah will leave her Head Start classroom to begin kindergarten in a suburb of Washington, DC. Like many of her Head Start classmates, she is a tiny bundle of joy and curiosity; she loves colored pencils and books of all sorts, and adores singing the alphabet song.
This week, both the House and the Senate are promoting their respective versions of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965.
Still, the Senate and House bills are vastly different, and the Senate version seems to have garnered more bipartisan support
With the reauthorization of the absurd and dysfunctional NCLB, we have a chance to once again let teachers teach and let students learn. We have a chance to ignite their imaginations, encourage them to reach their full potential, and expand their world view beyond filling in bubble tests with a #2 pencil.
If we are to achieve true equality as President Johnson envisioned half a century ago, then we must ensure that students from low-income communities are given the necessary resources and supports. For the civil rights community, accountability must be at the forefront of our actions.
If a low-income child is trapped in a school that has been failing its children for years, shouldn't someone in a responsible position act to intervene?
One would assume that if you are revamping an education bill you would certainly want educators to be making the decisions. But that is not the case. That is not who is rewriting our educational policy. Rather it is the 22 congressmen and congresswomen elected to office and heretofore listed here.
2. It Would Continue No Child Left Behind's Emphasis On Standardized Tests However, the bill still isn't perfect, according
At one of the most divisive political moments in our nation's history, in a piece of legislation that itself is controversial and has failed to be reauthorized despite numerous attempts over the past six years, a bipartisan amendment providing for education innovation and research sailed through a Senate committee.