exodus gods and kings

Selma delivers the Exodus that history keeps writing. Black Lives Matter in the 1960s and today. And like an arrow into Pharaoh's heart, the film asks with MLK in that Selma speech, when will "the conscience of America begin to bleed" again?
If North Korea can somewhat understandably raise a flag concerning what people might do after viewing The Interview, why are people not more concerned about the ideas put forth within the biblical stories?
Paramount Pictures' Bible tale "Noah" was banned in several countries in the Middle East this year for its depiction of a
I walked out after the parting of the Red Sea, which was depicted more as if an iffy forecast by Tom Skilling missed a low pressure system forming over Lake Michigan, than God majestically parting it to let his people go.
Never have I seen a movie so profoundly, completely and utterly misunderstand the point of its own story as Exodus: Gods and Kings did. In fact, it's so off that I can't help but wonder if maybe the film has a different agenda than I thought it did.
Perhaps what makes Exodus an engaging film also makes it a dangerous one. The drama becomes secondary to the lesson. War prevails over wisdom. The sensational replaces the scholarly.
The landscape of this film is colossal! If you get a chance, watch this on the big screen.
We have no way to ascertain whether Moses personally suffered from trauma. He lived long before history was written down in Israel and the stories about him are shrouded in centuries of later tradition.
Bale's Moses changes dramatically from a strapping, confident and commanding "prince of Egypt" -- the typical hero of braun and bravado -- to a wan, confused, tormented, exhausted servant.
Usually when a film depicting a story from the Bible is made, the main danger for a studio is angering religious groups who feel that the film is attacking their beliefs or strays too far from accepted (or at least favored) interpretations.