extraordinary rendition

When it comes to Trump, it is easy to vilify and jump on the backlash bandwagon, but it has been comparatively more difficult for Americans to vocalize their mortification for what has already happened.
In an age of too many laws, too many prisons, too many government spies, and too many corporations eager to make a fast buck at the expense of the American taxpayer, there is no safe place and no watertight alibi.
Yes, I still fulsomely reject Cheney's rationale for the first Iraq War. I understand his always tenuous, and now conclusively
8. What did Poland's former president Aleksander Kwasniewski admit? a. His country let the CIA operate a secret prison in
"[O]ne businessman said that doing business here is 'like doing business in the Yukon' in the nineteenth century, i.e. only
The European Court of Human Rights yesterday ruled against Poland, charging our ally with human rights violations for helping the CIA operate an 'extraordinary rendition' program. But no one at the CIA has ever been prosecuted for torturing suspects.
Both the Bush and Obama administrations have opposed all efforts, inside and outside the United States, to hold CIA personnel accountable for violations of human rights law and domestic law.
The capture of alleged al-Qaeda operative Abu Anas al-Libi by American forces last weekend in Tripoli raises a range of troubling questions. But the answer to one of them -- what to do with him now -- is clear.
"His (Seldon's) trial was political, not judicial... A pardon is the only possible way out," Spencer said. Lady received
There are two basic ways to go mad. One is historical and the other, existential. Your personality may be festering one or
If there has to be a library on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas, let it be named after the man who actually ran the country, and not the man who simply nodded his head in affirmation. Let's call it the "Richard Bruce "Dick" Cheney Presidential Library."
So powerful is the stigma of "terrorism" today that, in the name of "our security," whether in Great Britain or the United States, just about anything now goes, and ever fewer people ask questions about what that "anything" might actually be.
There was a scarcely noted but classic moment in the Senate hearings on the nomination of John Brennan, the president's counterterrorism "tsar," to become the next CIA director.
All told, of the 190-odd countries on this planet, a staggering 54 participated in various ways in the American torture system. No region escapes the stain. No region, that is, except Latin America.
In his Senate confirmation hearing, Thursday, CIA director nominee John Brennan noted that the United States "needs to make sure we are setting a standard for the world."
Reagan, indefatigable Cold Warrior and conservative advocate for American strength, did not believe in torture, rendition, military tribunals, or in military strikes with a high risk of killing innocent civilians.
NBC News dug up a report on the Obama administration's drone policy. Josh Hersh and Zach Carter join Marc to discuss.
Although Bush administration officials said they never intentionally sent terrorism suspects abroad in order to be tortured
If the former Soviet Union had built such an overseas gulag, run on the basis of torture and abuse, or if China did so today, there would be no question what Americans would have called it.
History is filled with examples of brave individuals who have broken the law to serve the greater good of humanity. In other