ezekiel emanuel

An Obama initiative to hold the line on spending has run into a lobbying buzzsaw.
Americans with terminal cancer are more likely than Europeans to die at home, not in a hospital
A predictable irony of the never-ending Affordable Care Act (ACA) debate is that the one provision that the Republicans should be attacking -- free "checkups" for everyone -- is one of the few provisions they aren't attacking.
“I’m not saying don’t go to the doctor when you have a complaint, or if you have an ongoing health problem, like you’ve got
Emanuel said his focus was on what would happen if he were to "stop taking medical care where the purpose of that medical
2014 was no slouch year. Over the past 12 months, one has seen a spectacular confluence of ideas, events and initiatives that demand fresh, thoughtful attention. So to the Buzzfeed-esque lists that cap the year - and effectively write the history of 2014 - let's add these five developments.
'There are no second acts in American lives,' Scott Fitzgerald famously wrote. That may have been true in Fitzgerald's day, but now, in the 21st century, as more and more boomers are transforming our expectations of old age, retired Americans are discovering third acts in their lives.
Rather than thinking of 75 as the time to die, let us continue to re-imagine 21st century life where 75 is a robust time of engagement and work. Perhaps for many even just the start of yet another phase of life.
Ezekiel Emanuel is a very distinguished scientist... Needless to say, his 5,000-word piece evoked a lot of debate, although everyone agreed he makes some important and startling points. They are his reasons for saying that he hopes to die at 75 and that, after he turns 65, he plans to discontinue all his health care -- no flu shots, colonoscopies, surgery, pacemakers.
When my grandfather was 75 I was in middle school. Although I enjoyed his company then, my appreciation for his wisdom and his ability to truly impact my life only materialized once I hit latter adolescence and early adulthood.
Both society and pharmaceutical companies promote the idea of seniors living healthily and happily until some moment in the distant future, when they will vanish in some kind of pain-free poof, most likely while salsa dancing on a Caribbean cruise ship. But the reality is a bit different.
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Republicans are conflating crises as if there's an ISIS terrorist with Ebola at the Border. Lowry and Shrum debate if hitting the panic button can work in November, and if Dems can counter with good economic news and GOP voter obstruction. Then: Is Panetta patriotic or betraying?

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, the well-known bioethicist and brother of the mayor of my town, argued recently in an essay in the Atlantic Monthly that 75 is the perfect age to die. After that, he said, most people have little to contribute to society and are a burden rather than a benefit. I can think of few less-Jewish ideas than this. It is not only heartless but wrong.
The Obama administration's decision to postpone the requirement that large employers offer health insurance to their workers has been characterized by pundits on the left as a capitulation to big business and on the right as the latest evidence that Obamacare isn't working. Actually, it's neither.
"The only way we're going to save money, improve the quality of care, improve people's lives is by focusing on prevention
It was nurture, then, not nature? Not exactly. The brothers also have a sister, Shoshana, born with cerebral palsy, and adopted
Patient outcomes have been superseded by paperwork. The new computer revolution now institutionalizes this fixation electronically. Patient care gets lost in the shuffle, often competing head to head with the bureaucratic demands.