F-35

During the mid-1930s, a best-selling exposé of the international arms trade, combined with a U.S. Congressional investigation
by Niv Sultan You couldn’t blame defense contractors for being in a great mood this week. In his speech to Congress on Tuesday
The Pentagon currently has over 640,000 private contractors. No one knows the exact number but this is almost certainly an
Rather than serving as an exception in a swamp of spending excess, the ending of the JLENS project should serve as a first step towards trimming other needless weapons programs and wasteful practices.
At the start of World War II, the combined economies of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan were only half the size of the United States. If for no other reason than the sheer weight of its factories and work force, America thereby held the strategic high ground.
Defense companies thrive when global conflicts drive up military expenditures, and Lockheed Martin is no exception. The company has made increasing its exports a top priority.
Rather than treating it as a jobs program, let's make the F-35 program rise or fall on its merits. That would mean holding off on the 450-plane "block buy" contemplated by the Pentagon, and deciding whether it's worth going beyond the 500 planes already committed to, out of a planned total of over 2,400.
These are weapons systems that are part human and part machine like the fabled half-man, half-horse centaurs of Greek mythology
It's not just that American consumers are helping to finance the construction of China's war machine. There is also the creeping loss of control over core strategic elements like the US food chain.
Voting is finally about to begin in the Republican and Democratic presidential primary contests. That's exciting. But it may not last.
Elections take place in the now, not the long-term, especially in an ahistorical American era. And the now these days in this ADD/hyper-partisan media environment is short-term and savagely prone to character assassination.
This week, the Republican presidential candidates square off in Las Vegas, Nevada for the last debate of 2015. Here's a hypothetical exchange between the CNN anchor of "The Situation Room" and the leading candidate
When you spend $400 on a motorcycle helmet, you have certain expectations about quality and safety. But what should you expect when your helmet costs $400,000? Well, if you expected it to be magically able to see through walls, you'd be right. It won't actually give you Superman's X-Ray vision, but it's pretty close.
If the F-35 was a state-of-the-art plane that provided unparalleled capabilities while fulfilling a clear need, perhaps it would be worth the cost. But it is none of these things.
People often ask me whether being President has made it more difficult to spend time with Michelle and our girls. But the surprising truth is that being in the White House has made our family life more "normal" than it's ever been.
While the OCO shenanigans were the most egregious example of irresponsible budgeting in the HASC bill, they were far from the only one. As usual, members added funding for items that the Pentagon didn't even ask for, in order to pay for a wide array of pet projects.
Shaw, who had been city manager since 2007, said in a statement that he had worked to better Ferguson. John Shaw, the city
It's budget season again, which means it's time for another round of budget gimmicks on the part of the Pentagon. The Obama administration's new Pentagon budget proposal exceeds the budget caps established in current law by $34 billion. That's a hefty sum even by Pentagon standards.
At a price tag of $1.5 trillion to build and operate over its lifetime, the F-35 combat aircraft is the most expensive weapons program ever undertaken by the Pentagon. It is overpriced, underperforming and unnecessary.