F. Scott Hess

Dolby Chadwick Gallery in San Francisco strikes me as being the epicenter of discombobulation. Two of the artists that show
My Making Art in the Internet Age class continues to blow my mind on a weekly basis. Last Thursday, the conversation started when one student objected to my use of the term 'bad' when saying something about art work online.
What kind of artwork gets the most response online? In the era of Instagram, where successful art careers are literally manufactured through the massive accumulation of 'followers', this is not a subject for idle speculation.
This was important information I was disseminating, linking what my students were painting to the greatest art of the last 3,000 years of Western civilization. And it just gets cut?! Excuse me?!
F. Scott Hess, Anchises Lost, 2009, oil on canvas, 25 × 35 inches. In the last ten years we've seen an incredible change
To lose a dear friend leaves a hole in the life of each who loved him. Losing the well of wisdom that is a great mind leaves gaps in the fabric of civilization, one of the great tragedies of human mortality.
Among the painters I know, skill is a hot topic. Everyone seems to intuitively know what it is -- they know it when they see it -- and the implications of having or not having skill are generating lively, fresh conversations and opinionated writing.
After decades -- some might say well over a century -- of standing aside while Duchamp joked and Pollock flung paint, figurative art is about to step into the spotlight and become the "next big thing."
It is unusual to see people crying over artwork these days. Most contemporary art seems to purposefully distance itself from emotion, relegating human sentiment to some basement realm far from the light of intellectual discourse.
In 1992 I flew into the Islamic Republic of Iran with my wife and two year old daughter on a trip funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and a Getty Museum Fellowship.