F. Scott Hess

You could certainly argue that Willem de Kooning was a discombobulator—an Abstract Expressionist Discombobulator—but the
My Making Art in the Internet Age class continues to blow my mind on a weekly basis. Last Thursday, the conversation started when one student objected to my use of the term 'bad' when saying something about art work online.
What kind of artwork gets the most response online? In the era of Instagram, where successful art careers are literally manufactured through the massive accumulation of 'followers', this is not a subject for idle speculation.
This was important information I was disseminating, linking what my students were painting to the greatest art of the last 3,000 years of Western civilization. And it just gets cut?! Excuse me?!
F. Scott Hess, Anchises Lost, 2009, oil on canvas, 25 × 35 inches. In the last ten years we've seen an incredible change
To lose a dear friend leaves a hole in the life of each who loved him. Losing the well of wisdom that is a great mind leaves gaps in the fabric of civilization, one of the great tragedies of human mortality.
Among the painters I know, skill is a hot topic. Everyone seems to intuitively know what it is -- they know it when they see it -- and the implications of having or not having skill are generating lively, fresh conversations and opinionated writing.
After decades -- some might say well over a century -- of standing aside while Duchamp joked and Pollock flung paint, figurative art is about to step into the spotlight and become the "next big thing."
It is unusual to see people crying over artwork these days. Most contemporary art seems to purposefully distance itself from emotion, relegating human sentiment to some basement realm far from the light of intellectual discourse.
In 1992 I flew into the Islamic Republic of Iran with my wife and two year old daughter on a trip funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and a Getty Museum Fellowship.
I've noticed many online defenders of Confederate heritage argue that their opponents do not understand history and fail to see beyond racial barriers. I have white southern roots deeper than most. I understand my history and the lineage of bigotry it entails.
There are in the lives of artists seminal figures that inspire you to be more than you were before you met them. For me that person was Richard Long, an artist and very unique professor.
For 40,000 years, long before mankind invented written language, we have put down marks that left a living trace of who we are, what we saw, and what we thought. We need those marks now more than ever before.
I first noticed that my dog, Roxy Hess, had artistic intentions when she left a forceful and unmistakable message on the floor of the studio we share. Slow human that I am, I hadn't realized that Roxy was not only on top of the latest developments in the artworld, she was running amongst the pack leaders.
The Southern California painter John Nava also has some concerns about painting's relevancy to contemporary culture: As a
You will find an occasional musician who purposely plays badly, or a writer who ignores grammar, but only in the visual arts is training in the traditional skills of the profession systematically and often institutionally denigrated.
With the debut of the cable series Masters of Sex, any purely art historical Google search for risque old master paintings is now totally skewed to the Showtime television program.
Shortly after moving from Mississippi to St. Louis in 1856, Dr. Alfred Lane Patton commissioned Calvin Lemuel Hoole, a self-taught painter in Missouri, to paint the history of the Lane, Thomas, Hampton, and Patton families.
Since its completion, this monumental painting has gone through several restorations. And here comes the latest - conservators