facebook-death

Last year, Chicago street performer Tom Loconti committed suicide. But before his death, Loconti—known as "Plainwhite Tom
Imagine if your great-grandchildren walk over to the latest voice-controlled computer of their day and say, "I want to talk to grandma." In just seconds, a "virtual you" is projected into the room ready for a quick conversation.
Death ends a life, but not a soul. The spirit lives on. But where does Facebook enter the picture? Does a Facebook profile get buried like a body? Or does it become a living spirit?
In this week's issue, Jaweed Kaleem examines the ways social networking sites like Facebook are opening up the conversation about death, allowing people's profiles to remain even after their death. And Jon Ward takes us inside the Republican party in the wake of Mitt Romney's loss to President Obama, revealing a party grappling with existential questions.
A new Facebook prank can leave a living friend's account very much "dead." "There ought to be an email sent to the account's
We're in a moment of unprecedented change when it comes to the conversation about death. Death, once a private issue, has also gone public and political. At HuffPost, we're covering stories about death.
The site, launched in 2005 and named after MySpace, which was the most popular social network at the time, includes sections
The Howard Brookner Facebook profile is full of photos of the acclaimed filmmaker, whose films include "Robert Wilson and
"She told me over the phone, right in front of my kids, and I completely had a meltdown. She wasn't supposed to but I guess