facebook envy

Have you ever carried a screaming toddler, over your shoulder, up the stairs and out of a birthday party with your eldest son being dragged along behind as you do? We have. This past Sunday actually.
But the worst Facebook numbers game (at least for me) is how many people send birthday greetings. I always send out birthday
Paying too much attention to your Facebook friends' updates could be bad for your mental health, according to a new study
Humans are called the "comparing creatures." Comparing ourselves to others is how we make sense of life. Comparisons can inspire us to grow and change. Comparisons can also provide helpful examples of what we don't want to be. But comparisons without context don't tell the full story.
The researchers based their findings on two studies involving 600 people with the results to be presented at a conference
Instead of comparing yourself to others, and feeling jealous on Facebook every time someone is doing something cooler than you are, self-acceptance will give you the confidence to love who you are and position you to support your friends, who in return, will carry you to extraordinary new heights.
Facebook Envy can be downright harmful to self esteem. But Facebook is an alternate universe, not reality. It's a ubiquitous PR machine where everyone's persona can sparkle brighter.