facebook-etiquette

The convenience and immediacy of social networking can easily allow us to forget our manners. Follow these ten essential steps to good Facebook etiquette to ensure you socialise without offending others or regretting your actions.
Someone posts about a book they've just read. They say, "Best book I've read in ages! Loved it!" Wanna give good Facebook? Here's what you don't say: "Oh, yes! I read it galleys last year and I just knew it was going to be a success when it was made available to the public at large!" Awful.
I steal your recipes and craft ideas. I pin your birthday parties and comment on your vacations. Your kids? They are so darn precious. But there are a few of you who just need to STOP it. Right now.
The moment I had my child, multiple people added me to parent pages. Like a rite of passage, suddenly, I was part of this media cult where discussions like what organic lotion to let your kid wear, strollers to sell and play dates took place.
I've compiled a list of people who you should probably defriend on Facebook. Like right now. These people most likely aren't going to become famous one day or own a company that you want to work for. So stop justifying, and start defriending.
She is just one cat picture short of having whiskers tattooed on her face. You know the woman sits on her couch day and night, stroking cats and talking to herself.
Posting during a wedding or other celebration requires adhering to a few guidelines and practicing common courtesy. Here are some etiquette tips to start the wedding season off on the right foot:
My husband Jon and I are only 12 years apart in age (I'm 52, he's 40), yet we are from profoundly different generations, with very different ways of viewing the world.
I don't like to make a big deal about my birthday. After all, it is just another day. That is, until Facebook came along and changed the world of birthday greetings as we know it.
Etiquette has a bad rap. We're used to think of it as something old and stuffy -- gestures embodying too much class snobbery and self-serving social hierarchy to be of much value in a pluralistic democratic society.
Everyone and their grandmas are on this strange microcosm of humanity called Facebook. The social network sounds nice and idealistic -- but it often changes people's personalities, at least how they come across online.
8) A Facebook page is not cause for concern Ninety-four percent of American teens have a Facebook page. If used appropriately
New research out of UCSF, published in the July 2013 issue of Social Psychological and Personality Science, found that people
Why is it that we feel everyone has to be alerted about everything about our lives? We have become a society of over-sharers. As if the me-generation wasn't self-involved enough, it has evolved into the please-look-at-me generation.
What happens if you're in a brand-new relationship? How do you handle social media and love on February 14th without having a digital disaster?
A friend’s son got married a while back, and because of an unfortunate rift with my friend, I was not invited. I did, however
For as long as people have been having kids, there have been "parental overshares": the moments when moms and dads complain
There are some things, however, that should really never be mentioned on Facebook. An unspoken etiquette is necessary when navigating social media sites, and these are some don'ts that you may have overlooked in the past.
Although Facebook has dramatically changed the rules of social interactions, there are some things that are still not allowed
Today, with Facebook and Twitter feeds across America lighting up with images of candy, roses and slightly creepy teddy bears, Valentine's Day has never been harder to avoid.