facebook-privacy-policy

So, like every other one of the world's 1.28 billion monthly active Facebook users, you blindly agreed to Facebook's Terms and Conditions without reading the fine print.
So, like every other one of the world's 1.28 billion monthly Facebook users, you blindly agreed to Facebook's Terms and Conditions without reading the fine print.
Facebook said that the timeframe for enacting the changes has nothing to do with the letter. But the executive director of
On Wednesday, six privacy groups sent a letter to the Federal Trade Commission insisting that new language Facebook wants
That poses some obvious challenges for Kate’s future self. It’s hard enough to get through puberty. Why make hundreds of
In the wake of this most recent feature rollout from the Facebook team, Consumer Reports Internet Privacy and Security Survey and the latest visual from Marketo are reporting that close to 13 million Facebook users have never touched their privacy settings.
Here is one iron law of the Internet: a social network's emphasis on monetizing its product is directly proportional to its users' loss of privacy. Facebook's latest program, Graph Search, may be the company's largest privacy infraction ever.
Again, to clarify some misconceptions about this bug, Facebook says it's inflating social plug-in numbers only... Facebook
This week I learned of something I find egregious: Facebook now claims the authority to determine what does and does not constitute art.
With the new direction of Facebook and the new privacy policy about to come out, where do you stand? Will you use Facebook less or more? Will you delete your account?
Mark Zuckerberg may think that Facebook's recurrent privacy flaps haven't much affected the sometimes anti-social social network, but they represent a huge potential threat to what he has built.
As we celebrate Data Privacy Day, we bear witness to a number of new privacy policies which are being presented, dare one say thrust, upon user populations for major online social networks.
Armed with nothing more than a Facebook user's phone number and home address, anyone with an Internet connection can obtain personal information they should never have access to.
In this digital age most of our personal information is already readily available. When in doubt always revert to rule #1: If you don't want the entire world to see something, then don't post it.
Facebook users are expressing shock that the company is looking to monetize their personal information. These people are probably also staunch believers in the Tooth Fairy.
A backlash over Facebook Inc.'s privacy practices has triggered disagreement inside the company that could force Chief Executive
Last week [the New York Times] asked readers to submit questions about Facebook and its approach to privacy, which Elliot
Openbook, a site that highlights Facebook users' most incriminating public status updates, was created in response to Facebook's