facebook-teens

Since 2016, Facebook has been paying users up to $20 per month plus referral fees to sell their privacy by installing the iOS or Android “Facebook Research” app.
If you consider yourself a self-proclaimed social media addict, or simply want to spend less time using social networks, here are some simple tips to break your addiction.
We know teens aren't that into Facebook anymore. Now we have some fairly stunning data from iStrategyLabs to back that up.
The data doesn't look at who's leaving Facebook just at who's on Facebook and these numbers indicate that adoption rates
Facebook is a godsend for Baby Boomers out of the workforce or stay-at-home moms, particularly in small cities or towns, but it's a liability for young people.
Facebook initially included, then removed, a line about how minors who join the site needed a parent or guardian to give
Not a week goes by without another story of an adult doing something colossally stupid on social media and paying the price. So why in the world did Facebook think it advisable to allow 13-year-old kids to make their pictures and status updates public?
(Reuters) - Facebook Inc removed a restriction for users under 18 that previously limited who could see their online postings
The timing could not have been worse. Two prominent writers have very publicly announced they're quitting Facebook, back-to-back, as the social network itself is embattled in a struggle to convince its youngest users Facebook is still "cool."
It would certainly change the culture of deception that leads kids and many of their parents to lie about their dates of birth to join social networking sites in the first place and provide a much safer environment for tweens who are already there in droves.
A few days ago, the media reported on a study done by researchers at the University of Wisconsin that concluded Facebook is indeed safe for consumption.
Twenty million teenagers under the age of 18 have Facebook accounts. Of that group, 7.5 million are under the age of 13—the
Adweek: What's the takeaway in your new study? Alice Marwick: The big takeaway is that kids do care about privacy, even though