fame

The “Empire” star teared up while reflecting on her journey to becoming an Oscar-nominated actress.
Here’s how Lady Gaga went from unconventional pop star to bonafide movie star in the hit film "A Star Is Born."
Although he pops up here and there, Josh Hartnett isn't chasing fame; actually, he's running from it.
We, as the viewing audience, are drawn to celebrities and famous people in ways we are not even aware. Within the lives of the celebrated lie the hopes and dreams of the rest of us.
Even though Joe Biden memes are giving this viral trend a run for it's money, there's no end in sight for the mannequin challenge.
Mindfulness practices of breathing, focusing, watching one's emotions, and managing our ego aren't complicated. These simple
Don't listen to Ferrante's outers or Kardashian's haters, who say that women who shy away from publicity are inviting exposure and women court publicity are inviting attack. Listen to women themselves when they declare how much privacy they want.
I'm going to preface this by saying I'm no expert on the inner workings of celebrity life. I write this from experiences I've lived and observations from my time working in entertainment as an assistant and in public relations.
Thousands watched and cheered as this blessedly brilliant Quarter Back from Indiana placed himself in a standout position, at Notre Dame and in the NFL for many years.
"Gone are the days of hard work into longevity."
Photo by Oliver Bokelberg This contemporary dance production includes graffiti and art by muralist John Valadez. During the
A major record company president once told me I'd probably never be a star because, as he put it, "You wouldn't kill your mother for it." Although this may have been an oversimplification, it takes a special personality to strive for and thrive in the spotlight.
A well known fact in the media, music and film industry is that any kind of publicity; whether positive or negative is eventually termed as 'good publicity'.
On Facebook and other social media platforms everyone appears to be a success. We show our best face, best version of ourselves
A little more than a year after Muhammad Ali lit the Olympics flame in Atlanta, creating perhaps the most emotionally satisfying moment in Olympics history, I was asked to join a small group accompanying Ali on a humanitarian mission.
Whether it's Instagram likes or Twitter RTs, everyone in today's world is looking for instant gratification. Many hope to become the next overnight success or make a million bucks before they turn twenty. But we seem to forget that most of the icons we idolize worked their asses off to get where they are. They didn't just start on The X Factor, or make a YouTube video of themselves singing.
The time is long overdue to re-imagine the very concept of fame. Enough with the vapid "fame for the sake of fame" corporate manufactured "stars," who appear out of nowhere to hog up the public airwaves and divert attention from the vital issues threatening our democracy and planet.
Johnny Manziel is a classic example of what happens when a person prioritizes their social life over their professional life. He had a golden opportunity, but he blew it because he couldn't stop partying, and the party scene eventually consumed him.