family act

The state will be the seventh to offer the benefit to new parents.
All that is positive, of course, but progress is still the exception rather than the rule. And that's costing our families
Here's the bottom line: The middle class is in crisis, and Secretary Clinton's proposals merely tinker at the margins of that crisis. They would not shift the fundamental direction of an economy that is growing more unequal every day.
2015 was a tipping point for paid leave in the U.S.
I see it happening all the time -- women who went to Ivy League schools and who held highly-demanding, high-status, high-pay jobs -- deciding to stay at home after they have a baby. They all thought carefully about their decisions, weighing the pros and cons. Instead of the prison of a 9 to 5 work culture, they preferred to keep their brains sharp and stay connected by volunteering and sitting on boards.
Business school professors are taking a big stand in favor of a federal law for paid family leave, but business lobbying groups still vehemently oppose the idea.
Right now, millions of workers are forced to choose between job and family when they need family or medical leave. Evidence shows that isn't good for families or for our economy.
The U.S. is currently the only major country in the world where mothers aren't guaranteed paid leave after childbirth -- forcing many to return to work before they are ready. Only 13 percent of U.S. workers have access to paid family leave through their employers.
A very young-looking Bill Clinton signs the Family and Medical Leave act in 1993. After decades of judging and shaming mothers