fantasy bond

The question of why love fades or why people grow apart in their relationships is one of life’s great mysteries. What prevents
Relationships are a great place to work on ourselves. There is no harm in trying each of the above steps, as you truly have nothing to lose. The worst case scenario is that you will have grown your own capacity to be loving, vulnerable, passionate and lively. The best case scenario is that you and your partner will grow closer and rekindle your loving feelings for each other.
Now, with all that said, of course there are some relationships that just don't work. Some couples actually have a toxic
Most of us treat love like an external force. It's something that happens to us, strikes us like an arrow or overcomes us like a storm. There is a problem with thinking of love this way, and that is that it can slant our focus outward.
So what can we do to give ourselves our best chance of maintaining that loving feeling we have when we first realize we are falling for another person? Here are five resolutions I believe all couples would truly benefit from taking on.
Our sexuality isn't something we have to pack away, set aside and then go out of our way to uncover. It is something we can carry with us that makes us feel alive. Taking time for sex shouldn't be looked at as an indulgence or an inconvenience. It can be a way to reenergize or relax, reconnect or reestablish feelings of excitement toward our relationship.
I don't believe in soul mates. That doesn't mean I don't believe in true love or the idea that two people can find each other and be truly happy together for the rest of their lives. What I reject, rather, is the belief that there is only one person in the world for us.
Trust can be a difficult thing to build, because people already carry their own defenses and distrust from past hurts, rejections and deceptions. Yet, trust and communication are fundamental to establishing closeness, intimacy and real love.
There may now be hard science behind the notion that true love can last a lifetime. A neurological study from Stony Brook University revealed that couples who experience "romantic love" long-term can keep their brains firing similarly to the brains of couples who have just fallen in love.
While love seems to be a universally valued attribute, defining love in behavioral terms can be a challenging undertaking.