Fay Vincent

There’s something about baseball in March, about spring training in Florida and Arizona. Yes, it’s a sign the new season
Dirk told us about his book at the South Dakota Festival of Books. David is a huge baseball fanatic, so the subject was of great interest to him. Dirk was fun, knowledgeable, smart and passionate, all wonderful ingredients for an author.
Vincent says he responded that if he went back and told Commissioner Giamatti that Pete Rose is the national treasure: "You
I believe it is wrong, and, yes, un-American, to say that a person's faith is a disqualifying factor, the same way it was wrong when some Americans declared that John F. Kennedy could not be trusted to be president because he was Catholic.
Pete Rose continues to feel that he has been unfairly treated by the baseball establishment, and I believe that with an expanded lens of the changing culture regarding athletes' transgressions, perhaps leniency in his case is now in order.
It is clear that over his long and rocky tenure as Commissioner of Baseball, Bud Selig left a massive legacy. The business and sport of major league baseball was impacted for good and for ill by the man who began his professional life selling used cars in Milwaukee. He will end his tenure as Commissioner by becoming the "Six Million Dollar Man."
That brings us to Pete Rose. He made it to one World Series, but usually chokes in the playoffs. Since the Yankees booked
Hanging with Fay Vincent made me realize even more about the pitfalls of money and power. And how too much of both can nourish bullying and grudges in American-as-apple-pie baseball. And in any field.