FEC

My team and I collected data on junk news. Our conclusion: voters didn't get the information they needed during the U.S. election.
BY: ASHLEY BALCERZAK What is unusual is how Trump's campaign has been dealing with over-the-limit donations once it is aware
Federal campaign finance regulators have received a formal complaint against Boston-based Thornton Law Firm, calling for an immediate investigation into whether attorneys violated the law by acting as "straw donors" for their law firm.
New allegations that a pro-Hillary Clinton outside spending group and two that are backing Donald Trump have illegally coordinated with the candidates' campaigns are refocusing attention on a concept that regulators have never quite nailed down.
Yesterday morning, we published a story saying that Jeffrey Miller, campaign manager of former Texas Gov. Rick Perry's 2016 presidential campaign and the director of his leadership PAC, received nearly half the money spent by those organizations. Yesterday afternoon, we pulled the story.
This week, the Federal Election Commission did the unthinkable. The agency most frequently characterized by its constant, crippling deadlock levied a substantial fine against three large politically active nonprofit groups.
Cary Peterson spent all of May behind bars in New Jersey, arrested for securities fraud and sending handwritten complaints to the district court about the difficulty of using prison phones. He spent June getting out on bail and creating a new super PAC.
At the outset of the general election, Hillary Clinton’s campaign looks like a well-oiled juggernaut next to Donald Trump’s
Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump has repeatedly trashed super PACs and claimed he would run as a candidate who couldn't be bought. Through the end of April, it looked like no one really wanted to try that anyway.
The Federal Election Commission also wants to know about a $1,650 payment to Christian Unified Schools.
There are reasons to question the propriety of a federal officer attempting to "blunt" a First Amendment ruling against her agency, and I am unaware of another federal entity whose commissioners take to the pages of major newspapers to decry binding Supreme Court precedent.
The notion of limiting what can be spent on influence is preposterous and infeasible in so many ways that the average person, who hasn't given the issue a lot of thought, is unlikely to grasp.
This kind of unregulated campaign finance system has resulted in massive corruption scandals in the past. It will do so again in the future. Citizens United has brought an onslaught of big money from the Super Rich who are treating federal campaigns as their political playground.