fed

Simply put, the Fed pulled off a magic trick that would leave Houdini gasping. Janet Yellen and the Fed took the made-up money and bought Wall Street assets that would have otherwise crashed and gave money to Wall Street banks that would have otherwise gone bankrupt...with no strings attached.
You've probably heard by now that the Federal Reserve executed a long-awaited interest rate hike in December. Though this move was both inevitable and sorely needed, it's not great news for borrowers. In fact, your student loan interest rates might have gone up as a result.
Getting away from D.C. every so often helps with perspective. Life inside the Beltway can cloud one's views and lead to an
So, if you combine the negative effects above, you can see just how dangerous a deflationary cycle can be.  Deferred spending
Monetary economics is gasping for breath. The usual links between the money supply, inflation and GDP seem tenuous after the Great Financial Crisis.
CNN.com recently published an article (Store closings are the hottest trend in retail) about the rash of retail store closings
With the S&P 500 now down about 10% from its all-time high in May 2015, a certain level of fear has returned to the markets
There it is again: the Fed rate hike talk we've missed so much since last December. Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen said on Wednesday that risks for the U.S. economy are rising and indicated that the central bank may delay its next interest rate hike in March.
There's a lot we don't know. (It's so amazing that I just looked it up to confirm that it really happened, and it did!) After