federal spending

New York's governor wants to know “who is bailing out whom" when it comes to federal aid for coronavirus battle.
Every political observer knows that we're living in a time of historically low trust in government and high partisan polarization. But a growing federal commitment to accountability and transparency could begin to change that.
Listening to all the campaign trail chatter of increasing defense spending, one could conclude that deficit reduction has fallen off the political radar. But, it this what the voters want?
The government spends about $1 on healthcare of every $4 that Americans pay in federal income taxes.
Remarkably, a few priorities have broken through the partisan gridlock as things that appropriators from both parties agree that the U.S. budget should support. For the past few years, wildlife trafficking has been one of those priorities.
President Obama included in his budget an important initiative to strengthen the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program.
Though for understandable reasons the leading Republican presidential candidates continually emphasize the things that divide them, we would do well to concentrate rather on the things that do not.
The federal spending omnibus package President Obama signed today represents months of negotiations by the House and Senate. And while some of the loudest and largest passengers on that omnibus include defense spending, tax reform, and homeland security, a number of critical animal causes fortunately found seats as well.
These Republicans (Trump included) seem totally in agreement that progressive taxation is less effective than light taxation; that it is the scale of public spending and debt which is holding back economic growth, and that it is the burden of taxation to sustain that spending which currently is the key barrier to the generation of private sector-based enterprise and employment.
The CBO's main estimate includes another important assumption that changes the outcome substantially. In calculating how