feeling invisible

Now after a year of thought, I get it. Some of us feel very invisible. Widowhood, divorce, lack of friends, and boredom as
6. I feel guilty when I outgrow friends. I am gathering information and exploring my options for 'us.' I will keep you posted
I did not say a specific age, nor did I say all women are faced with this dilemma. After all, these feelings depend on the
The authorities say that 50 is the new 40, 60 the new 50 and 70 the new 60. That statement should give us faith to continue to embrace our opportunities.
What an amazing experience it would be to have a young parent ask how they could be a better parent, and then not punish us for insinuating they aren't doing a good job. What happiness we would feel if advice was actually sought out, and the wisdom provided used and built upon.
Whether you are waiting to cash-out or check-in to your hotel room, standing in line at Starbucks or a business networking event ... or just passing another in the hall, being ignored and feeling invisible has become commonplace.
Here's the simple fact of life that I have learned to be very true: the ultimate cause of suffering is our disconnectedness from ourselves.
The spiritual leader and author of the forthcoming Super Genes explains how to feel seen again.
I am not negating the feelings of any woman who feels like she's become invisible and mourning the passing of her youthful looks. That being said, I have never felt invisible. I'm one hundred percent corporeal and there's even more of me than when I was younger, so I have extra for others to see.
Here's an if-a-tree-falls-in-the-forest question: if society didn't tell older women they were invisible, would older women still feel invisible? I loathe the power that stale older-women-are-invisible narrative wields.
At work, we are seldom brave; we seldom break rank or challenge the people (mostly men) who treat us poorly. Overnight, I
Is it wrong that I sort of wish that ONE man would catcall me when I walked down the street? That was my initial reaction to the Catcall Woman Video that went viral last week. I felt dirty even thinking that out loud.
I admit that it's plausible for a 48-year-old woman to transform herself at will from an invisible hag into a noticed and admired woman, but when you're 60, or 70 (as I am) you're permanently in the 'invisible' category, unless you're, say, Joan Collins or Jane Fonda.
As Editor of an online magazine devoted to lifestyle and culture for the hip:) +50 set, I've realized I need to address the widespread issue of older women feeling they've become 'invisible'. As their 'looks fade', older women feel they seem to be fading along with them, right into thin air.
Perhaps being ample sized isn't optimal, but I've come to the conclusion that it just may be who I am. I'm in the process of doing an, 'I love myself' experiment.
A recent study -- by a company that sells herbal products to menopausal women -- found that women start to feel invisible around the age of 51. They no longer feel men notice them when they walk into a room, nor do they see admiring glances coming their way. The result, says this study of 2,000 women, is depression.
I began to realize I had acquired a cloak of invisibility when it came to men a few years before I turned 50. I was no longer on the receiving end of the prolonged glance, the admiring wink, or, hell, even an acknowledgement I was in the same breathing space as a male of the species.
Women, especially older women, often feel invisible. Like many women, I spoke out in the 1960s. I pushed hard to build a career in a 'man's world' and I started the Sixty and Me community to give women over 60 a voice. But, even though I value my voice and believe that women have every right to be heard, I have to admit, there are times when I love my cloak of invisibility.
This is not another one of those articles listing all the ways we can make ourselves look younger. Nor is it one that will help us confront and psychologically "deal with" the natural process of aging.