Felons

Reality Winner’s mom says her daughter caught COVID-19 behind bars while convicted former Trump aides are set free from prison during the pandemic.
The Democratic presidential hopeful now has a plan to restore voting rights for felons, but he didn't seem to care much about the issue two years ago.
They were convicted and disenfranchised. But, on Tuesday in Virginia, thousands exercised their right to vote.
The effects of the post-2010 redistricting have been dramatic. Until 2010 Ohio Congressional districts were roughly evenly
Ex-convicts are likely to re-offend. And recidivism, he notes, has many costs. Former convicts who re-offend do grave injury
Incoming Kentucky Governor, Matt Bevin, set to work quickly. Through a series of executive orders, Bevin ensured that thousands of poor and minority individuals would not vote this year or potentially ever.
Contrary to the scare headlines, the TSA's SPOT method is working and there's data* to support that conclusion. Whence the headlines? The tests of TSA's effectiveness were themselves ineffective. Dr. Ekman elaborated.
There is no city in the nation that's growing faster than the population of 70 million Americans with criminal records. As one of them, former real estate developer R.L. Pelshaw is determined to turn this costly societal burden into an opportunity.
Research finds that felon disenfranchisement laws have influenced the outcomes of both presidential and Senate elections. Such laws disenfranchised almost 6 million voters this year -- most of them poor and people of color.
When low income voters turnout at a higher rate, Republicans are more likely to propose voter ID laws. One study finds that the indirect costs of these laws are higher than poll taxes were at the times they were instituted.