femme lesbians

@huffpostgay #WhatFemmeLooksLike pic.twitter.com/3gCQNNpmKG — Samantha Orlando (@CallMeGryff) September 27, 2014 Most homophobia
As long as this statistic is being touted as a scientifically proven fact, we have a problem. It is daily espousing a condescending correlation between lesbian identity and unhealthy weight. This notion is and will continue to affect the physical and emotional well-being of many a queer girl, both young and old.
Each week I receive hundreds of letters from feminine lesbians worldwide who feel invisible. These raw and often emotional messages inspired me to produce this video. Its intention is to help more women realize that their feelings regarding their sexual orientation are legitimate and that they are not alone.
Youtube hasn't just brought ROSWEGLYN together as friends, but it also has brought a whole new community along with it where acceptance is key.
We had talked about language not long after we got engaged, but hadn't come to any conclusions. I didn't like referring to myself as the "bride" because that has very girly/feminine connotations to it for me.
2013-11-21-jodisavitzlesbianstereotypesstill.pngHow would unsuspecting passersby answer the question, "What do you think a lesbian looks like?" The on-the-spot question: "Can you name three lesbians in the media or popular-culture?" Some people's answers may surprise you.
My frustration is this: Even after coming out, feminine lesbians walk through life feeling unacknowledged and delegitimized and are often chided for speaking up about their invisibility.
Feminine lesbians are often told 'you're too pretty to be queer,' and bear gays are rendered invisible by their masculinity, yet the term 'gay face' is used as an insult. Is there a such thing as 'looking gay,' and is there a cultural value to it?
Most people who spew such nonsense expect me to delight in their backhanded praise, but believing that there is a point at which a woman is too attractive to be gay is based on the assumption that heterosexual women are inherently better-looking, and that's homophobic.
Revealing that I am a lesbian often causes even more trouble, because straight people (men in particular) can't seem to grasp the concept that a lesbian can be girlie-looking.
I want femme lesbians to be recognised for who we are, to be acknowledged, accepted, and respected. I do not want to be seen as my partner's sister, and I do not want to be viewed as not truly belonging to the lesbian community.
Once upon a time, I tried not to date anyone shorter then me, not because I think any less of shorter women, but as a femme, I had it stuck in my head that my partner should and would be taller and bigger than me.
If asked to think of a lesbian, most people's thoughts drift to the stereotypical image of a butch lesbian. It may come as a surprise to some that this is not the only type of lesbian that exists, oh no -- there are some who are "femmes."
Does knowing you're gay early in life affect what type of lesbian you're going to end up being? Or is a butch a butch and a femme a femme no matter when the proverbial lightbulb goes off that says "Oh, I'm so gay!"?