feral cats

Are feral cats nothing more than a zombie apocalypse for biodiversity?
I don't recall where I was headed that autumn day back in 1999 when my life changed forever. It might have been to the grocery store up the block or the hardware store around the next corner.
Shit's kind of heavy for all of us right now, and we have a long road ahead, but I thought maybe, just maybe, you'd like five minutes of light reading about how I saved a cat and she saved me.
It's a question to which I've given a great deal of thought since I first began blogging about the ongoing witch-hunt against outdoor cats nearly six years ago, and it mostly comes down to the following:
Opposition to A.2778 was shameful, even for PETA -- an organization whose better-off-dead philosophy drives their long-running opposition to TNR, just as it drives their demonization of pit bull terriers.
TNR has been successfully used in the U.K., Denmark, South Africa, Israel, Panama, Mexico, and Canada. If it's good enough
Despite opposition from more than 12,000 animal welfare advocates, Washington, D.C.'s Department of Energy & Environment (DOEE) continues its witch-hunt against outdoor cats.
I came to love these girls as my own fur kids, and I'd like to think they love me back the same way as their human. Considering all things, I was at the very least an upgrade from their last human pseudo mom, who would get annoyed with them and lock them in the garage.
While we may have little to defend against a zombie apocalypse, when it comes to the plight of community cats - we know the answer, and we will continue to fight for their right to live.
Even today, this is the fate of older shelter cats because potential adopters tend to choose kittens over adult cats. How can they not? Kittens are cuddly tabla rasas that meow sweetly and have blue eyes.