Fidesz

There is widespread concern that Hungary is drifting away from democracy.
Diane Stone, University of Canberra Ignoring protest from around the world, the Hungarian government has fast-tracked legislation
BUDAPEST -- Europe is dealing with an unprecedented refugee crisis. Building a fence -- as Hungary is doing -- isn't going to fix anything. But it's unlikely this fence will be the last.
Misreadings of what's taking place on the eastern stretches of Europe contribute to an almost 1946-like sense of foreboding and inevitability.
Gabor Harangozo is one of the new young leaders of the Hungarian Socialist Party. He started out, as many of his generation did, working with Fidesz, which in the early 1990 was a liberal youth party. Gradually, however, he grew disenchanted with market liberalism and moved toward social democracy.
Hungary has a rich tradition of environmental activism, from the anti-dam campaigns of the 1980s to the nature conservation efforts of the post-Communist period. It has also seen the rise and fall of a number of Green parties, including the most recent, Politics Can Be Different (LMP).
Attila Ledenyi was one of the early shapers of Fidesz. He was in charge of international relations in the organization's early years. He's quick to remind me, when we met last May after 23 years, that Fidesz wasn't a political party in those early years.
On the surface, Hungary enjoys freedom of the press. The Internet is a veritable free-for-all displaying a full range of opinions. But if you look a little deeper, this freedom of the press is actually quite limited.
It is the tension between the aggressively political competition at the polls and the aggressively non-political rhetoric of the heartland that characterizes the Populist Reformation. What drops out is the middle: the back-and-forth politics of liberal democracy.