Film Society of Lincoln Center

This week I talked with Rick McCarthy, President of the Board of Directors of the Provincetown Film Society about the Provincetown
A. I'm so glad you picked up on that. I do see a surprising trend here--the rise of Judaism in Africa. There is what is called
If you are more interested in Indie films, head down a couple of blocks to Lincoln Center's own movie theaters. Their beautiful
Kate Manx in Private Property Warren Oates: You know the name. You'd recognize the face. Rarely the leading man, usually
Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973). Wanna see Bob Dylan as a laconic, knife-wielding cowboy? Sure you do! Dylan also did
"Doc Fortnight 2016, February 19-29 featuring MoMA's annual international festival of nonfiction film, with 10 days of important
I crave, in no particular order, respect for the audience, respect for the story and its characters and respect for women. It boils down to the basic definition of the principle of this grand word "respect," which is "due regard for the feelings, wishes, rights or traditions of others."
One of the more enjoyably offbeat features at last year's New York Film Festival that is only now seeing the light of day is Martin Rejtman's Two Shots Fired. This comic offering showcases Argentina as a land plagued by emotional neutrality. No smiles. No Howard Beale outbursts. No fidgety tots and no Lotharios aquiver.
Manhattan is an island awash in film festivals. If there are new movies with a thematic niche, chances are there's a film festival with a clever lineup of screenings -- and film junkies lining up outside -- somewhere the city.
Seeing Richard Gere and Bill Murray -- as well as their new films -- back to back this week invites comparison: movie stars for the past 35 years, they continue to do superlative work in both Hollywood and independent films.
I've been covering the New York Film Festival since 1987 and have, over the years, developed a bit of a love/hate relationship with it, as an institution (specifically, Film Society of Lincoln Center) and as a festival.
When movies do "talk to each other," says Kent Jones, "that's always great." Certainly it's fair to say that noir films, from Maps to the Stars, to Gone Girl, to Foxcatcher, dominate much of the conversation in the fest's 52nd edition.
Needless to say, certain tropes follow actor/ director/successful-son-of-a-famous father Rob Reiner around: one is the epithet
Brazilian cinema for me always possesses a dream-like quality that is punctuated by the grittiness of everyday life. Castanha is no exception, but it does add another layer to the puzzle.
I adore fairy tales and have never really grown up from that joy I felt as a child, listening to my grandfather read me stories by the Brothers Grimm or watching the Disney videos. But these days I require a little more heft, turmoil and character development. That's where Fabio Grassadonia's and Antonio Piazza's touching drama Salvo comes in.
All kinds of cats pepper world literature, from the Cheshire cat that would tease Alice while perched on a tree branch to Dr. Seuss's famous Cat in a Hat. Although many people have a soft spot for Felix the Cat, one of my all-time favorites is Bill the Cat, from Bloom County.
In theater news, the 2012 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, Water by the Spoonful, extends its run by two weeks. This play is the second in a trilogy by Quiara Alegría Hudes.
When I approached two of my male dancers about shooting what I envisioned as a tender but very physical love scene, I expected resistance and came prepared with a speech about my personal commitment to portraying fully formed gay characters. Alas, the speech was unnecessary.
This year's festival shows a continuing dedication to movies that can be both crowd-pleasing and intellectually satisfying.