Financial News

It's been about a year since we posted our last list of people to follow on Twitter for financial news. Time for an update!
There are many reasons people struggle with money. For some, it could be that they spend too much. For others, it could be that they don't know how to make their money grow and work for them.
The IRS tax filing deadline is this week, and the average refund so far has been about $3,500. The question is: what should you do with that refund? The truth is, a tax refund can be a lifesaver for some, but can cause more trouble for others.
In my 30 years of interviewing more than 1,200 of the world's wealthiest people, I've found some major differences in how the wealthy approach money compared to the middle class.
How many times have you read observations about investors being "nervous" about "missing gains"? Do you ever wonder who these investors are, or how the author has been able to accurately characterize their collective mood?
My job requires reading a lot of financial news. It's one of my favorite parts. But it gives me a front-row seat to the downside of financial journalism: gibberish, nonsense, garbage, and drivel. And let me tell you, there's a lot of it.
The core of the problem is the media need to fill up time and pages with fresh news or they won't be able to capture your attention. Much of the "news" is of little help to investors. Often, it is misleading and harmful.
As Canadian energy stocks are finally seeing a bit of a push, and demand for Canadian commodities looks set to rise, juniors are confident that economics will ensure that Canadian oil--the cheapest in the world--will find its way to more markets, with or without Washington's approval of Keystone XL.