financial sector

A question: If the takers aren't standing in the unemployment line or rushing home from the second job to change diapers, just where are they? Because an awful lot of America's resources have gone missing. Like money that should be going to education, job training, healing the sick, retirement funds, infrastructure and, you know--life.
Financial inclusion helps lift people out of poverty and can help speed economic development. It can draw more women into the mainstream of economic activity, harnessing their contributions to society. And it will help governments provide more efficient delivery of services to their people by streamlining transfers and cutting administrative costs.
Van Hollen puts the focus squarely on the corporate behavior that has driven down wages and crushed middle-class aspirations. His proposal would boost worker income, which drives the economy forward. When Republicans oppose this, the choice will again be clear to Americans: CEO millionaires or working families.
These lawmakers' roles and the actions they take in the next two years may say more about the future of Wall Street support
Glaringly absent in the Fed's policy platform is a commitment to a fair architecture for capitalism that equitably distributes the fruits of enterprise by providing incentives for ethically pricing each person's contributions to the sustainable public good.
I do believe that to restore "trust" in the financial sector, a new hard look is required. It is important to change priorities and develop moral empathy and conscience.
Growing income inequality continues to weaken the American middle class and stagnant wages, low wage jobs replacing those with livable wages and fewer government investments compromise the ideals that make this country strong.
The question is not whether or not speculators assist in the efficient operation of the market but whether or not that type of speculatory behavior should be extended fully to a commodity so vital to the livelihood of nations, especially people in the middle class and poor.
The stock and bond markets should not be the only ones rejoicing at Larry Summers's withdrawal from consideration to run the Federal Reserve. The nation's workers should, too. Janet Yellen, the remaining frontrunner for the position, is no wimp on inflation.
Financial stocks are the second-biggest sector in the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index and are well on the way to overtaking technology as the biggest industry in the broad stock index, Bloomberg reports. Guests Jason Weisberg and William Dickens join to discuss.
Banks aren't necessarily going to destroy the economy again, at least not in the very near future. But it always helps to
Fiscal Times: There are many other market failures in health care markets, e.g. patients not knowing enough about treatments
Those in finance argue that they create plenty of jobs and midwife many more by providing the financing that keeps the economy
(Hat tip: NBC News) In 2012, 41 percent of Wall Street workers admitted to being ready to leave the financial industry, according
This is not what has happened to banks who knowingly sold bad mortgages to people who could not afford them, then sold them off to investors in the market bundled into AAA rated securities. So, why is criminal court off the table in the financial sector?
Every once in a while--and it does not happen very often -- something comes along that deserves to have a strong influence
A new generation of finance shark pups have been growing in the muddy waters of big business since the 1980s.
Last year was an awful one for many on Wall Street. But not everyone struggled. Some even partied like it was 2006. That
Though Silicon Valley is primarily known as the home of technology giants and smaller tech startups, Vecchiarello said the
To contact the editor responsible for this article: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.net To contact the writer of this article