financial transactions tax

Over the past week, we've seen two breakthroughs on the issue of taxing Wall Street speculation - one in the United States and one in Europe.
Think of it as the "Brexit wake-up call." It was certainly not an intelligent way to remake the European Project on the fly, leaving great risks in its wake. But there remains the potential for a flourishing Great Britain of the future.
The goal for all working families remains a secure, sustainable job and a real improvement in our standard of living. Here's how we get there.
Tension are flaring as the New York primary approaches. The candidates are getting tough with each other, and their supporters are getting even tougher. The New York debate was almost too painful to watch. But is the fighting really that warranted?
In case there was any doubt, the presidential election fight has confirmed that blasting Wall Street, even eight years after the financial crisis, is still a vote-getter.
The real story will be revealed only if she releases the transcripts from the three speeches she gave to Goldman Sachs for which she was paid $675,000. Her unwillingness to do so strongly suggests she has something to hide. What did she really say? Here's a reconstruction.
Clinton's "broccoli" is apparently better for us than Sanders' "ice cream."
If Bernie captures the nomination, then what does his "political revolution" look like? Arguably, whether he wins or loses the nomination, our task will be roughly the same.
Both Wall Street and Hillary Clinton came under heavy fire in a heated Manhattan speech.
Ten European governments have made major progress towards the creation of the world's first regional tax on financial transactions. This is exciting news for the growing campaigns around the world, including the U.S., to promote taxes as a means of generating much-needed revenue.
The AFL-CIO's new figures have come out amidst a proliferation of new policy agendas that include executive compensation reforms and are aimed at shaping the 2016 election campaigns.
Elected leaders in Washington are heading into another season of wrangling over the same old federal budget revenue shortfalls. But a number of European countries are looking forward to a revenue injection from a fresh and deserving source: high flyers in the financial markets.
There's a pattern here. Whenever the push for taxing Wall Street speculation starts to build some serious steam, the Obama administration dusts off their proposal for a big bank fee. This fee idea was is a good one. The problem: Obama officials have presented the big bank fee as an alternative to a financial transaction tax.
The Obama administration has long opposed a financial transactions tax. In his memoir Stress Test, Geithner ridicules reformers
High Frequency Trading (HFT) is essentially no different from a highwayman standing in the road with a gun demanding a tributary toll from all who would go about their business to the better without him.
On May 6, 2010, the Dow Jones Industrial Average suffered its fastest nosedive ever. What happened? What's clear is that high-frequency trader accelerated the free fall by withdrawing from the market en masse. Four years after they caused the "Flash Crash," those speed demons still rule our financial markets.
Rejecting dozens of heroic characters, from Captain America to Underdog, Republicans last week chose instead a villain for their figurehead.
At a time when financial markets are dominated by computer-driven high frequency trading that has little benefit for the real economy, a tax of even a fraction of a percent could encourage longer-term sustainable investment.