financial transactions tax

Over the past week, we've seen two breakthroughs on the issue of taxing Wall Street speculation - one in the United States and one in Europe.
Think of it as the "Brexit wake-up call." It was certainly not an intelligent way to remake the European Project on the fly, leaving great risks in its wake. But there remains the potential for a flourishing Great Britain of the future.
The goal for all working families remains a secure, sustainable job and a real improvement in our standard of living. Here's how we get there.
Tension are flaring as the New York primary approaches. The candidates are getting tough with each other, and their supporters are getting even tougher. The New York debate was almost too painful to watch. But is the fighting really that warranted?
In case there was any doubt, the presidential election fight has confirmed that blasting Wall Street, even eight years after the financial crisis, is still a vote-getter.
The real story will be revealed only if she releases the transcripts from the three speeches she gave to Goldman Sachs for which she was paid $675,000. Her unwillingness to do so strongly suggests she has something to hide. What did she really say? Here's a reconstruction.
Clinton's "broccoli" is apparently better for us than Sanders' "ice cream."
If Bernie captures the nomination, then what does his "political revolution" look like? Arguably, whether he wins or loses the nomination, our task will be roughly the same.
Both Wall Street and Hillary Clinton came under heavy fire in a heated Manhattan speech.
Ten European governments have made major progress towards the creation of the world's first regional tax on financial transactions. This is exciting news for the growing campaigns around the world, including the U.S., to promote taxes as a means of generating much-needed revenue.