first year of college

The great thing about college is that you are on your own and treated - more or less - as an adult. That's also the worst
Madeleine Winterich (UCSB ‘19) Most incoming college freshies hate the idea of having an RA. I mean, we came to college to
The cost of college is not declining. And with the constant reminder that student loan debt is getting out of hand, parents and students are trying to find ways to make higher education more affordable. Even so, some families may not even realize that they are voluntarily increasing their expenses.
Those strangers on a train got me looking back my days as a dad by focusing on facts instead of feelings. Hence, I've developed this list for my son. It compiles all the important numbers (some estimated) that spring to mind as I contemplate life with a son who is now on his own.
If you're about to start your freshman year of college, you're likely having a lot of mixed feelings. The best way to channel your excitement and calm your anxiety is to go into college with a plan that will help you be successful in your academic studies, professional dreams, and personal life.
It's about that time again. Sleepy college towns will begin to awaken, abuzz with an excitement that only college students can inspire. Young scholars will soon arrive on college and university campuses, ready, or not so ready, to take on the world of higher education.
This nostalgia -- the choice of spending a Saturday night watching Finding Nemo rather than sipping Yellowtail -- is nature. Homesickness is real occurrence, but so too is youth-sickness.
To help you get off on the right foot, here's what every freshman can do to ensure success long after that first year of college is in the rearview mirror.
If you have spent the last 18 years building a strong bond with your child, then he/she likely has a strong inner core thanks to the trust and confidence you have helped him/her gain throughout the years.
Last fall I asked several high school girls why they decided to attend a women's college and shared their reasons in a blog post. For this blog post, I thought it would be fun to re-visit with those students to see how their first semester at college went.
For a first-year student adjusting to life away from home, the smallest inconvenience can feel like a dramatic, earth-shattering event. First-years live in a world of extremes. Many arrive on campus expecting the college experience to be perfect immediately.
Like the colorful and constant noise of summer fireworks, advice for college first-years has begun exploding from all directions. Celebrations are mixed with a nervous excitement that will not be matched or replicated ever again.
First-year students want a friend group. And they want it immediately. If a student doesn't have one, was ditched by one, or is in the process of seeking a new one, college can be a very lonely place.
A lot of students will choose to drink alcohol at some point during their time in college. That's the reality. It's how they drink and how they value drinking that always gets my attention.
For most college students, there will never be another time in your life when so many understanding, well-trained people are genuinely interested in helping you succeed.
If you sit in a classroom and never meet the instructor, you will be a number. If you never join an organization, play recreational sports, or volunteer, you will be a number.
Many students enter college misinformed about how to succeed academically. Use this article as a jumping off point to think about the differences between high school and college academics.
The freshman myth results in disenchantment when new college students' academic, social, and personal expectations are not met after arriving at college.