fish fraud

From 2010 to 2012, Oceana tested more than 1,200 seafood samples to examine fraudulent labeling. After completing DNA analyses, they found that one-third of fish samples were mislabeled.
Americans now eat 50 percent more seafood than they did 50 years ago, according to a new report by Oceana that details the cost of seafood fraud on consumers' wallets.
As many Americans gear up to kick off their summers -- and perhaps celebrate the upcoming World Oceans Day this Saturday by enjoying some fresh seafood -- the question must be asked: Do you really know what you're eating?
Imagine yourself at a restaurant ready to order your favorite dish and being told by your server that there is a one in three chance you will not receive the same item that is on the menu. Would you order it anyway?
We can only prepare and eat safe and sustainable seafood dishes if we are given honest information about how these products are harvested, bought and sold. The current system isn't designed to ensure that accountability is a constant player in seafood production.