fish fraud

Rebecca Price, Head of Finance and Professional Services at the Cabinet Office, told Apolitical, 'Companies want really highly
The fishing industry remains an unregulated Wild West. So how can consumers protect themselves against eating tainted or mislabeled fish? As activists led a revolution in dairy that demanded milk without added steroids, it's time we do the same for seafood transparency.
Retailers trying to profit from mislabeling cheaper seafood as more expensive varieties have come under increasing fire from
Widespread mislabeling presents a problem for seafood lovers who want to buy wild shrimp instead of farmed because it's more
From 2010 to 2012, Oceana tested more than 1,200 seafood samples to examine fraudulent labeling. After completing DNA analyses, they found that one-third of fish samples were mislabeled.
Americans now eat 50 percent more seafood than they did 50 years ago, according to a new report by Oceana that details the cost of seafood fraud on consumers' wallets.
The report argues that seafood traceability is key in stopping fraud. And while that seems like an easy enough thing to support
As many Americans gear up to kick off their summers -- and perhaps celebrate the upcoming World Oceans Day this Saturday by enjoying some fresh seafood -- the question must be asked: Do you really know what you're eating?
In February, British sushi bar Moshi Moshi used a similar concept -- with a twist: If the "Meet Your Meal" concept sounds
Imagine yourself at a restaurant ready to order your favorite dish and being told by your server that there is a one in three chance you will not receive the same item that is on the menu. Would you order it anyway?
We can only prepare and eat safe and sustainable seafood dishes if we are given honest information about how these products are harvested, bought and sold. The current system isn't designed to ensure that accountability is a constant player in seafood production.
Though we do need better regulation, the real issue is the supply chain. It's constructed around an outdated model in which suppliers hide their sources, dealers hide their markets, and fish becomes a commodity whose value is lost from the people and communities who harvest them.
From shrimp heists to illegal fishing, dolphin shootings to whale ship strikes, fishy crimes (in the literal sense) are abundant, but thankfully NOAA's fish cops are on hand to fight the lawlessness of the sea.